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Is there a way to make a templated C++ function implicitly convert all pointers to a void*? I'm working on a lightweight Lua binding and I'd like to avoid writing the exact same function for every pointer type when the void* version is all I need.

Declaration:

template<class T>
T GetFromStack(lua_State* L, int index);

Definition:

template<> void* GetFromStack<void*>(lua_State* L, int index)
{
    return lua_touserdata(L, index);
}

If I was to call myVariable = GetFromStack<MyStruct*>(L, 0);, the C++ compiler would complain that I haven't defined a function for a MyStruct*. Is it possible to have every pointer type matched to the void* version implicitly?

EDIT:

I see how my question is a bit confusing, I'm not really sure how to word it. I'm attempting to come up with an automatic binding system. This GetFromStack function is called from another templated function:

template<class T_return, class T_param1, class T_param2 >
int LuaFunction(lua_State* L, T_return (*func)(T_param1,T_param2));

which is implemented like this:

template<class T_return, class T_param1, class T_param2 >
int LuaFunction(lua_State* L, T_return (*func)(T_param1,T_param2))
{
    T_param1 a = GetFromStack<T_param1>(L, 1);
    T_param2 b = GetFromStack<T_param2>(L, 2);
    T_return ret = func(a,b); 
    PushLuaType(L, ret); // <-- This is another templated function 
                         // like GetFromStack that has the same problem
    return 1;
}

I then create a Lua version of whatever function I want to expose to Lua with a simple macro:

#define DeclareLuaFunction(function) \
    static int ##function##_lua_(lua_State* L) \
    { \
        return LuaFunction(L, function); \
    }

This works really well so long as I use the predefined types. I have versions of GetFromStack written for all the "basic" types (int, float, etc) and obviously void*. But I don't want to have to write one for every one of my custom type's pointers. When I create a function that uses a MyStruct2, I'd have to write yet another version of GetFromStack that's identical to every other pointer version.

This system would be used like this:

struct MyStruct
{
    int a;
    float b;
};

int AddToMyStruct(MyStruct* s, int x)
{
    int original = s->a;
    s->a += x;
    return original;
}

DeclareLuaFunction(AddToMyStruct);

Which would then have T_return as an int, T_param1 as a MyStruct* and T_param2 as an integer too. I already have int versions of GetFromStack and PushLuaType, but I don't have MyStruct* versions. With the way it's implemented now, I'd have to write a new version of GetFromStack for every type I come up with, even though every implementation would be the same.

EDIT: Andreas' solution would work if theres a way I can determine if a type is a pointer or not at compile type. If my T_param1 is a MyStruct*, it will be passed as such to GetFromStack, instead of as a MyStruct.

share|improve this question
    
So you want GetFromStack<MyStruct*>(L, 0) to return a void*, not a MyStruct*? I don't see how that can possibly be useful. When I read something like GetFromStack<MyStruct*>(L, 0), I expect the thing to return a MyStruct*, not a void*, so that I can actually do something with it. You use void* when you have no idea what the type is, but it appears in this case you already know what it is in advance. –  In silico Feb 25 '12 at 8:32
3  
I'm not sure what you're asking... what's wrong with just void* GetFromStack(lua_State* L, int index)? (i.e. not using the template) –  CAFxX Feb 25 '12 at 8:33
1  
You seem to be a bit confused. The specification of lua_touserdata() is exactly what you ask for! void *lua_touserdata (lua_State *L, int index);. Just use it as it stands if void * are all you need. –  Andreas Magnusson Feb 25 '12 at 12:27
    
@CAFxX: Very valid point based on my original question. I've clarified a bit to explain exactly why I need a templated solution. –  Kyle Feb 25 '12 at 20:00
    
@Kyle: So is there any difference in what GetFromStack() does, depending on whether it should return a pointer type or not? If there isn't maybe a template <class T> T GetFromStack(...) is all you need and just skip the void * overload as it will confuse the compiler (as all ptrs are implicitly convertible to void *) –  Andreas Magnusson Feb 26 '12 at 23:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, here's a new try based on your additional info. As has been said before, much of this could be done much easier if you opt to use C++11, but this should work in most older compilers as well.

First you need a way to detect whether your template param T is a pointer, you could either use std::is_pointer<> (which is preferable) or define one yourself like:

template <class T>
struct is_pointer
{
  enum {value = false};
};

template <class T>
struct is_pointer<T *>
{
  enum {value = true};
};

template <class T>
struct is_pointer<const T *>
{
  enum {value = true};
};

Next you need to alter your implementation based on it. To do that we introduce a helper class (or struct as I'm too lazy to write public) which has several specializations, one for each ordinary type and one for pointers:

template <bool ispointer, class T>
struct GetFromStackHelper;

template <>
struct GetFromStackHelper<false, int>
{
  static int GetFromStackFun(lua_State *l, int index)
  {
    return lua_tointeger(l, index);
  }
};

// ... add the rest of the built in types here

template <class T>
struct GetFromStackHelper<true, T>
{
  static T GetFromStackFun(lua_State *l, int index)
  {
    return static_cast<T>(lua_touserdata(l, index));
  }
};

Finally we tie it together with the GetFromStack function, which now should not have any specializations:

template <class T>
T GetFromStack(lua_State *l, int index)
{
  return GetFromStackHelper<is_pointer<T>::value, T>::GetFromStackFun(l, index);
}

Which you could use as:

int i = GetFromStack<int>(luaState, 6);
MyStruct *p = GetFromStack<MyStruct *>(luaState, 5);
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I am looking for, however I don't think it will work with my templated function that calls GetFromStack. I've clarified my original question with some more information. –  Kyle Feb 25 '12 at 19:37
    
Sorry I missed your update. This works perfectly. Thanks! –  Kyle Mar 12 '12 at 0:43

If I understand it correctly, you need to implement the function differently for different types, but the implementation happens to be the same for all pointer types.

If the value was passed as a parameter, you'd use normal function overloading. In this case, you can use enable_if.

template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_pointer<T>::value, T>::type
    GetFromStack(lua_State* L, int index)
{
    return lua_touserdata(L, index);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm fairly certain std::enable_if isn't part of C++03. Neither is std::is_pointer. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 25 '12 at 15:39
    
@avakar: I would prefer a standards-conforming implemention if at all possible. C++98 would be ideal. I've updated my original question with more information. –  Kyle Feb 25 '12 at 19:47
    
@Kyle: enable_if<> is available in the boost library, example –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 25 '12 at 20:11
1  
@NicolBolas, it's C++11. –  avakar Feb 25 '12 at 21:36
1  
@Kyle, even in C++98, both enable_if and is_pointer are few lines of code. Take a look at Boost implementation and just copy it over. –  avakar Feb 25 '12 at 21:38

I'm not quite sure if this is what you're looking for, but...

How about passing function pointers?

Your compiler's probably going to give you a bunch of warnings, but it should work.

void *GetFromStack(void *p, int index, void * (*func)(void *, int)) {
    return func(p, index);
}

void * (*func)(void *, int) is a function pointer to one that takes a void pointer and an int and returns a void pointer, which you supply as the first 2 parameters to GetFromStack. Just use the reference operator & to get a function pointer for the function you want it to call.

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