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I am wondering whether I can do the following efficiently in Matlab. Writing a naive loop for the problem is pretty straightforward, but I am trying to find whether there are any specialized functions one could use (perhaps arrayfun / accumarray (?) -- both of which I have great trouble in understanding!) Thanks in advance.

Let's say I have two vectors as follows (in Matlab):

A = [15 4 9 6 7 5 11 3 14]; 
B = [2 7 13]; 

I would like to do the following:

  1. Sort B, if not sorted already.
  2. For every successive windows in B (i.e., [2,7], [7,13]), find the corresponding elements in A that lie within the window.
  3. In this "partitioned" A, decrement by 1 n-times from those elements in A that lie in the n-th window of B.

Example: In the above case, the first window of B is [2,7]. The elements in A that lie within this window are [5,4,3,6]. As they lie within the first window of B, I need to decrement 1, one time from each of these elements. The new A will look like the following after this operation: A = [15 3 9 5 7 4 11 2 14];

Can this problem be reduced to a few function calls in Matlab or one should go through the naive loop business anyway? Thanks!

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I learnt that in recent versions of matlab for loops are no longer a bottleneck. (see stackoverflow.com/questions/9217024/… ). So likely you will not gain much by vectorization. but if you post your existing code we can check if optimization is possible. –  bdecaf Feb 25 '12 at 9:27
    
Oh Okay! Good to know. Thanks for the link. –  mskb Feb 25 '12 at 9:41
    
@bdecaf: TheMathWorks have been working hard to speed up loops since R2007. For simple loops, the optimization is pretty good, but as soon as the loop gets more complex, you'll suffer from the overhead Matlab incurs with each function call. Thus, vectorization may still bring improvements, as long as you have sufficient memory available. –  Jonas Feb 25 '12 at 12:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This can be done quite easily by using the histc function to determine in what bin (what you called "window") the values are.

A = [15 4 9 6 7 5 11 3 14];
B = [2 7 13];
B = sort(B); 
[~, bin] = histc(A, B);
A = A - bin;

edit: I noticed my solution is different from yours, but I suspect you made a mistake in your calculation. Do you have to subtract 2 from the values within the second bin or do you leave them as-is? If you only want to change the values in the first bin, the last line should read A(bin==1) = A(bin==1) - 1.

A = [15 4 9 6 7 5 11 3 14]; % initial value of A
A = [15 3 9 5 7 4 11 2 14]; % your reference result
A = [15 3 7 5 5 4  9 2 14]; % my result (as above)
A = [15 3 9 5 7 4 11 2 14]; % my result with A(bin==1) = A(bin==1) - 1

To change in what bin a value on the edge of a bin should end up, you can try to add/subtract eps from B.

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+1 - Egon strikes again :) –  Andrey Feb 25 '12 at 11:25
    
Thanks @Egon. Your solution was great. I need to subtract 2 from the 2nd bin, n from the nth bin. –  mskb Feb 26 '12 at 9:14

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