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I have the following code:

def subStringMatchExact(target,key,matches=(),base=0):
    if find(target,key) != -1:
        matches += (find(target,key)+base,)
        base += find(target,key)+len(key)
        subStringMatchExact(target[find(target,key)+len(key):],key,matches,base)
    else:
        print matches
        return matches

When I run the function, say for instance subStringMatchExact('abcdabcdababcdedakcdobcdabcd','abc'), the print matches line will have my interpreter print (0,4,10,24), which is correct. However the line return matches returns value None.

Similarly when I call print subStringMatchExact('abcdabcdababcdedakcdobcdabcd','abc'), the interpreter also gives None.

Can anyone help me correct this?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I rather think that you intended to return the recursive value on line 5. As it is, it just calls it and then continues to the end of the method, returning None. So, all you need is the insertion of the return keyword.

def subStringMatchExact(target,key,matches=(),base=0):
    if find(target,key) != -1:
        matches += (find(target,key)+base,)
        base += find(target,key)+len(key)
        return subStringMatchExact(target[find(target,key)+len(key):],key,matches,base)
    else:
        print matches
        return matches
share|improve this answer
    
Understood, worked like a charm, thanks! – hotdogning Feb 26 '12 at 8:21
    
@hotdogning: please remember to mark the answer as "accepted" when you're happy with it. – Chris Morgan Feb 26 '12 at 13:17

I think you mean for the statement at the end of the if clause to say:

return subStringMatchExact(...)

The return statement beneath your print statement is indeed working — it is successfully sending the answer back up the chain to the instance of the function that called it — but then the copy of the calling function is throwing it away. Without a return in the first clause of the if statement, a None gets returned instead.

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