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For those experienced with C, this will be a simple memory allocation/referencing problem:

Here are my data structures:

struct configsection {
    char *name;
    unsigned int numopts;
    configoption *options;
};
typedef struct configsection configsection;

struct configfile {
    unsigned int numsections;
    configsection *sections;
};
typedef struct configfile configfile;

Here are my routines for initializing a configsection or configfile, and for adding a configsection to a configfile:

// Initialize a configfile structure (0 sections)
void init_file(configfile *cf) {
    cf = malloc(sizeof(configfile));
    cf->numsections = 0;
}
// Initialize a configsection structure with a name (and 0 options)
void init_sec(configsection *sec, char *name) {
    sec = malloc(sizeof(configsection));
    sec->numopts = 0;
    sec->name = name;
    printf("%s\n", sec->name);
}
// Add a section to a configfile
void add_sec(configfile *cf, configsection *sec) {
    // Increase the size indicator by 1
    cf->numsections = cf->numsections + 1;
    // Reallocate the array to accommodate one more item
    cf->sections = realloc(cf->sections, sizeof(configsection)*cf->numsections);
    // Insert the new item
    cf->sections[cf->numsections] = *sec;
}

I believe my problem originates in my init_sec() function. Here is an example:

int main(void) {

// Initialize test configfile
configfile *cf;
init_file(cf);

// Initialize test configsections
configsection *testcs1;
init_sec(testcs1, "Test Section 1");
// Try printing the value that should have just been stored
printf("test name = %s\n", testcs1->name);

Although the printf() in init_sec() successfully prints the name I just stored in the configsection, attempting the same thing in the printf() of main() produces a segmentation fault. Further, addsec() produces a segmentation fault.

share|improve this question
2  
@IntermediateHacker: Thanks. Is there a reason for this? – thoughtadvances Feb 25 '12 at 11:40
    
well, not if you're just using standard C. but sometimes, with GObject etc. it may cause problems – ApprenticeHacker Feb 25 '12 at 11:42
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This routine should be

void init_file(configfile **cf) { 
    *cf = malloc(sizeof(configfile)); 
    (*cf)->numsections = 0;
    (*cf)->sections = NULL; // You forgot to initialise this.
}

i.e. called by init_file(&myconfigfilepointer); so the malloc return value gets passed back.

Need to do the same trick for init_sec

This function is incorrect - here is a corrected version

void add_sec(configfile *cf, configsection *sec) {     
    // Increase the size indicator by 1     
    // Reallocate the array to accommodate one more item     
    cf->sections = realloc(cf->sections, sizeof(configsection)*(1 + cf->numsections));     
    // Insert the new item     
    cf->sections[cf->numsections] = *sec; // Since arrays start at 0     
    cf->numsections = cf->numsections + 1;     
} 

You then need to adjust the calls in main

share|improve this answer
    
With () added like this: (*cf)->sections, I think this might be the solution. – thoughtadvances Feb 25 '12 at 11:47
    
Ah, yes. You noticed that I was assigning my array values incorrectly. Excellent! – thoughtadvances Feb 25 '12 at 12:05

At no point do you initialise cf->sections, which means when you try to realloc it the first time, you're passing rubbish. Adding:

 cf->sections = NULL;

to init_file should help.

You're also not checking any return codes, but you knew that yes?

share|improve this answer
    
hehe, I missed that one also +1 :) – Geoffrey Feb 25 '12 at 11:44

You need to pass a pointer of the value to be updated... eg:

// Initialize a configfile structure (0 sections)
void init_file(configfile **cf) {
    *cf = malloc(sizeof(configfile));
    (*cf)->numsections = 0;
}

configfile *var;
init_file(&var);
printf("%d\n", var->numsections);

Otherwise you are just updating the local pointer *cf and not the original passed in value

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm... Getting there. *cf->numsections = 0; produces a "not a structure or union" error. – thoughtadvances Feb 25 '12 at 11:41
1  
added order of operation bracing to the answer, give that a go. – Geoffrey Feb 25 '12 at 11:43
    
This answer is completely wrong. You need (*cf)->numsections = 0 or (*cf).numsections = 0 - they are equivalent - not a combination of both. Update: my mistake - see below. – Tim Feb 25 '12 at 11:45
    
@Geoffrey: Oh, yes! I've seen that before! Thank you. – thoughtadvances Feb 25 '12 at 11:45
    
@Tim - I thought I fixed that??? its not completely wrong, its a syntax error, and (*cf).numsections is invalid, its a pointer to a pointer in the definition. – Geoffrey Feb 25 '12 at 11:46

You need to really rethink how function arguments are passed in C and what pointers are. Your problem has nothing to do with memory allocation. Rather, your code is assigning a pointer to dynamically allocated memory only to a local variable, of which the calling code knows nothing.

While you could solve the problem by passing a pointer to the caller's pointer (i.e. a double pointer), this is not necessarily the most elegant or most usual way of handling things. Rather, you should return the result of the allocation from the function. While you're at it, you should also use calloc to zero out the memory right away. Wrapping it all up:

typedef struct substuff_
{
    int a;
    double b;
} substuff;

typedef struct stuff_
{
    unsigned int n;
    substuff * data;
} stuff;

substuff * init_substuff()
{
    substuff * const p = malloc(sizeof *p);
    if (p) { p->a = 5; p->b = -0.5; }
    return p;
}

stuff * init_stuff()
{
    substuff * const p = init_substuff();
    if (!p) return NULL;

    stuff * const q = malloc(sizeof *q);
    if (q) { q->n = 10; q->data = p; }
    return q;
}

As an exercise, you should write the corresponding functions void free_substuff(substuff *) and void free_stuff(stuff *).

share|improve this answer
    
This solution looks much more elegant. I find it difficult to keep track of what is pointing to what in a double pointer situation. I will attempt to implement this. – thoughtadvances Feb 25 '12 at 12:11

Yes, there is a problem in init_sec

// Initialize a configsection structure with a name (and 0 options)
void init_sec(configsection *sec, char *name) {
    sec = malloc(sizeof(configsection));
    sec->numopts = 0;
    sec->name = name;
    printf("%s\n", sec->name);
}

You're just copying the name pointer here, which means, that it points to the original storage of name. If you'd call init_sec like this

configsection foobar()
{
    configsection sec;
    char name[80];

    get_name(name);
    init_sec(sec, name);
    return sec;    
}

The name pointer became invalid the moment foobar returned. You need to duplicate the string and keep your private copy around. In init_sec:

    sec->name = strdup(name);

But there's more. In the very first line of init_sec you're overwriting the pointer that was passed to init_sec with the one of malloc. So the new pointer never gets passed back to the calle. Either use a pointer to a pointer, don't take a configsection pointer at all (after all, you're allocating), but just return the allocated pointer: Complete corrected function:

// Initialize a configsection structure with a name (and 0 options)
configsection* init_sec(char *name) {
    configsection *sec = malloc(sizeof(configsection));
    sec->numopts = 0;
    sec->name = name;
    printf("%s\n", sec->name);
    return sec;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this appears to be correct. If I attempt to access the name value outside of the initialization function, then I simply get (null). – thoughtadvances Feb 25 '12 at 11:59
    
@thoughtadvances: Sorry, I prematurely clicked "answer". You've got two problems there. One is the not duplicated name string, the other, that you're allocating memory, but never pass back the pointer. – datenwolf Feb 25 '12 at 12:14

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