Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What would be the runtime complexity of this piece of code. The code works as it is supposed to work, I am just a little confused about the runtime complexity.

int Something(int x[]){
int i=0;
for(i=0;i<x.length;i++){
    //some code over here
    i=-1;
}

Please be aware this is not an infinite loop since there is a continue and break statement in the loop. However it does loop quite a few times because of the condition i = -1 at the end of the loop.

O(n) complexity means that there are no nested loops and this code has no nested loops. But I don't really think this will be O(n). It also won't be O(n^2) or anything like that since there aren't any nested loops.

share|improve this question
3  
Are you asking about memory or time? O(n) complexity means that there are no nested loops and this code has no nested loops -- it's not that simple. It also won't be O(n^2) or anything like that since there aren't any nested loops -- not that simple. there is a continue and break statement in the loop -- how are we supposed to help if we can't even see all of the code? – Matt Fenwick Feb 25 '12 at 11:49
2  
Impossible to say without seeing the break / continue conditions. Please post the rest of your code. – Nick Barnes Feb 25 '12 at 11:49
    
What is the maximum number of times i=-1; is executed? When is it executed w.r.t. the last value of i? – Alexey Frunze Feb 25 '12 at 11:50
3  
That's like asking for the complexity of while(f()) { }, where "f is some function that returns some value". Ask the author of f, not us. – Kerrek SB Feb 25 '12 at 11:53
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In it's current form this is O(infinity). It might never stop.

If there is a break statement in the loop you have to provide the full code. Without that, analysis is not possible.

share|improve this answer
2  
Read the rest of the question. It does stop. – Nick Barnes Feb 25 '12 at 11:48
    
@Nick Barnes: I updated my answer at the time you created that comment.. – Karoly Horvath Feb 25 '12 at 11:50
    
+1 O(infinity) is correct whether it stops or not :) – ypercubeᵀᴹ Feb 25 '12 at 12:00
    
@sch: No, it doesn't. O() is an upper limit. For more accuracy, Θ(), I agree. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Feb 25 '12 at 12:11
1  
@sch: that's Θ(1). but also O(infinity). – Karoly Horvath Feb 25 '12 at 12:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.