Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I had referred this question (I changed its title). I am aware that code generation related to virtualness are implementation specific. However, earlier question suggests that, there is an additional cost related to virtual inheritance, when calling non-virtual base method.

I wrote following test codes and checked its assembly in g++ (with -O4):

Common part

struct Base {
  int t_size;
  Base (int i) : t_size(i) {}
  virtual ~Base () {}
  int size () const { return t_size; };
};

struct D1 : virtual Base {
  int a[10];
  D1 () : Base(0) {}
  ~D1 () {}
};
struct D2 : virtual Base {
  int a[20];
  D2() : Base(0) {}
  ~D2 () {}
};

...

void foo (Base *p) 
{
  if(p->size())
    return;
  p = 0;
}

int main ()
{
  Derived d;
  foo(&d);
}

Now the difference part is here:

Code 1 (normal inheritance)

struct Derived : Base {
  Derived () : Base(0) {}
  ~Derived () {}
  int a[100];
};

Code 2 (virtual inheritance)

struct Derived : virtual Base {
  Derived () : Base(0) {}
  ~Derived () {}
  int a[100];
};

Code 3 (multiple virtual inheritance)

struct Derived : D1, D2 {
  Derived () : Base(0) {}
  ~Derived () {}
  int a[100];
};

Overall code here.

When I checked its assembly, there is no difference between all 3 versions. And following is the assembly code:

        .file   "virtualInheritFunctionCall.cpp"
        .text
        .p2align 4,,15
        .globl  _Z3fooP4Base
        .type   _Z3fooP4Base, @function
_Z3fooP4Base:
.LFB1:
        .cfi_startproc
        rep 
        ret 
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE1:
        .size   _Z3fooP4Base, .-_Z3fooP4Base
        .section        .text.startup,"ax",@progbits
        .p2align 4,,15
        .globl  main
        .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB2:
        .cfi_startproc
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        ret 
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE2:
        .size   main, .-main
        .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.1-9ubuntu3) 4.6.1"
        .section        .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

Does it mean that virtual inheritance doesn't have any extra cost, when certain optimization is ON ? Do I need to perform any more complex test code to evaluate this ? Note that, without optimization, there is a difference between these assemblies.

share|improve this question
1  
What's the point of the final p = 0;? p is just a local variable. Also, Base is standard-layout and D1 and D2 are empty, so it's not surprising that there's room for optimization. – Kerrek SB Feb 25 '12 at 12:35
    
I would expect that any extra cost would come when you call the non-virtual function size through a Derived*, not when you call it through a Base*. The type Base has no knowledge of whether or not some other class inherits it virtually, so there's no way that virtually inheriting from Base can result in an overhead when calling a function in Base through a pointer to Base. – Steve Jessop Feb 25 '12 at 12:48
    
@SteveJessop, no difference in assembly results when checking with Derived*. I choose Base* in context of earlier question, where accepted answer suggests that. @Kerrek, I simply wrote p = 0, so that compiler don't optimize the if condition. Nothing much. – iammilind Feb 25 '12 at 13:23

Rather than performance, I want to know how the virtual inheritance deals with non-virtual base methods

Obviously, it will adjust this or class pointer then pass it to original method.

You might be able to observe overhead if you adjust 3rd example this way:

  1. Add virtual methods (non-overlapping names) to Base, D1 and D2. This will cause compiler to create virtual method tables.
  2. Add non-overlapping data fields/member variables (non-overlapping, different names) to Base, D1, D2 and derived.
  3. Add non-virtual method to D2 that operates on data fields in D2 and Base.
  4. Add non-virtual method to D1 that operates on data fields in D1 and Base.
  5. Add non-v\irtual method to Derived that calls aforementioned non-virtual methods in D2 and D1 then operates on data fields in D2, D1, Base and Derived.
  6. Investigate disassembly.

Also, once there are some member variables, you might want to investigate layout of resulting Derived class in debugger.

When I checked its assembly, there is no difference between all 3 versions

Inheritance (virtual or not) might add a little difference in a sense that compiler might decide adjust pointer to class when converting it from Derived* to Base* (or this if base non-virtual method is called from derived method) or vfptr. This will result in adding some value to current value of this or pointer before passing it to function/method.

However, this most likely will be done at the point when function call is invoked and it most likely will occur only when multiple inheritance is involved (because there might be more than one virtual method table). I.e. if you make class C that inherits classes A and B and they all have virtual methods, but no common ancestors, then when you call method that belongs to A from C you might see pointer adjustments in disassembly. But that's it. the cost of such overhead will be ridiculously small.

Please note that this is compiler-specific question, and everything i've written here is based on observation of microsoft compiler. I.e. it is "undocumented feature", as a result, if you worry about performance, you should use profiler instead of trying to guess performance impact. Main priority should be code readability anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Code 2 is diamond inheritance. Rather than performance, I want to know how the virtual inheritance deals with non-virtual base methods – iammilind Feb 25 '12 at 13:27
    
@iammilind: Updated my answer. That should demonstrate pretty much every overhead you might run into. – SigTerm Feb 25 '12 at 13:50
    
@iammlind: Also, although you "want to know", the answer will be compiler-specific. – SigTerm Feb 25 '12 at 13:56

First, take a look at foo:

void foo (Base *p) 
{
  if(p->size())
    return;
  p = 0;
}

Since Base::size() is non virtual, there is no virtual dispatch overhead with p->size().

Next, look at how you invoke foo:

int main ()
{
  Derived d;
  foo(&d);
}

Here, you are taking the address of an instance whose type is known statically, i.e., given an instance of Derived, the compiler can statically determine how to convert that to a Base *. So, no matter how Derived inherits from Base, the compiler knows how to convert it.

You need an example with less type information available statically to measure the impact of virtual inheritance.

share|improve this answer
    
Made some code changes, however there is no difference between the assemblies. – iammilind Feb 28 '12 at 4:57
    
@iammilind, you just added an if statement. The compiler still knows statically how to convert from Derived or Derived2 to Base, i.e., without hitting the vtable. – MSN Feb 28 '12 at 5:47

protected by iammilind Feb 28 '12 at 2:48

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.