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I have a paragraph such as "All are good but God is great all the time and God is great all the time......".

My result should be only one sentence: "God is great all the time". Please help me to get good regular expression

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uh ? I don't understand what you want ? What kind of sentence do you want ? – Jerome Cance Feb 25 '12 at 12:53
    
You cannot do this with a regular expression, your going to need an algorithm. Is this homework? – Perception Feb 25 '12 at 12:53
    
@Jerome, I need to find a good regex to find some set of sentences from my huge log file.. so I gave a sample to explain my question. – Balakrishna Feb 25 '12 at 12:55
    
@Perception, this is not home work actually :) I am strugulling with regex to understand. I have requirement to find some set of sentences that repeates in the log file, but I only want one time.. – Balakrishna Feb 25 '12 at 12:55
    
@Balakrishna - if you don't know what the phrases are ahead of time then my original comment stands, you cannot do this with a regular expression. You could probably code up a version of a directed acyclic graph, that stores words instead of characters. Each node would have a count and your repeated phrases would be all the partial graphs of connected nodes with count greater than 2. – Perception Feb 25 '12 at 13:03

My result should be only one sentence: "God is great all the time".

...because it is the longest substring that occurs twice in the input?!

That is not possible to solve using regular expressions I'm afraid.

Regular expressions can match strings against patterns. It's not a tool for doing arbitrary string computations.

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