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I got the following string:

"312 ,22 ,+12 , -12 , 5331"

it is possible to have more than 1 space between numbers.

I need to convert it to an array like that:

int arr[] = {312,22,-12,12,5331};

Is there a pretty and elegant way to do this with C89?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use strtok + atoi:

# include <stdio.h>
# include <stdlib.h>
# include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    char numbers_str[] = "312 ,22 ,+12 ,-12 ,5331", *currnum;
    int numbers[5], i = 0;

    while ((currnum = strtok(i ? NULL : numbers_str, " ,")) != NULL)
        numbers[i++] = atoi(currnum);

    printf("%d\n", numbers[3]);
    return 0;
}
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THANKS! this exactly what I meant when I said elegant! –  Nahum Litvin Feb 25 '12 at 14:15
    
This is nice, but it does leak memory since currnum will be NULL when the free(currnum) is done. –  Vaughn Cato Feb 25 '12 at 15:06
    
@VaughnCato Could you please elaborate? Edit: Ah, I understand! What should I do? Assign "foobar" to "currnum," before I call free? :P –  Gandaro Feb 25 '12 at 17:52
    
Oh – that would not work, would it? I have to remove the whole malloc part, right? –  Gandaro Feb 25 '12 at 18:00
    
Yeah, the malloc/free are completely unnecessary actually. –  Vaughn Cato Feb 25 '12 at 18:05

Suggest:

  1. Use strtok() to split the string into tokens.
  2. Use atoi() to convert the tokens to ints.

For allocating the array to store the ints you could either:

  1. Allocate as each token is processed, using realloc(), or
  2. Have two passses through the string, with the first pass counting the tokens in the string and malloc() the array in a single operation.

Example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <assert.h>

int* make_int_array(char* a_str, size_t* const a_elem_count)
{
    int* result      = 0;
    char* tmp        = a_str;
    char* last_comma = 0;

    /* Count how many ints will be extracted. */
    *a_elem_count = 0;
    while (*tmp)
    {
        if (',' == *tmp)
        {
            (*a_elem_count)++;
            last_comma = tmp;
        }
        tmp++;
    }

    /* Add space for trailing int. */
    *a_elem_count += last_comma < (a_str + strlen(a_str) - 1);

    result = malloc(sizeof(int) * (*a_elem_count));

    if (result)
    {
        size_t idx  = 0;
        char* token = strtok(a_str, ",");

        while (token)
        {
            assert(idx < *a_elem_count);
            *(result + idx++) = atoi(token);
            token = strtok(0, ",");
        }
    }

    return result;
}

int main()
{
    char s[] = "312 ,22 ,+12 ,-12 ,5331";
    int* int_list;
    size_t int_list_count = 0;

    printf("s=[%s]\n\n", s);

    int_list = make_int_array(s, &int_list_count);

    if (int_list)
    {
        size_t i;
        for (i = 0; i < int_list_count; i++)
        {
            printf("%d\n", *(int_list + i));
        }
        printf("\n");
        free(int_list);
    }

    return 0;
}

Output:

s=[312 ,22 ,+12 ,-12 ,5331]

312
22
12
-12
5331
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Yes, you can use the sscanf function to get the integers into the array elements. I assume here there is a small fixed number of integers in your string.

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I'm not a C programmer, but ANSI C (or C89) does have a "split" function called strtok.

#include <string.h>
#include <stddef.h>

...

char string[] = "words separated by spaces -- and, punctuation!";
const char delimiters[] = " .,;:!-";
char *token;

...

token = strtok (string, delimiters);  /* token => "words" */
token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "separated" */
token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "by" */
token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "spaces" */
token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "and" */
token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "punctuation" */
token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => NULL */
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Why not use sscanf(str+offset, "%d,%n", &newValue, &offset) repeatedly until it fails.

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and how do I handle failure? i don't have try/catch.. –  Nahum Litvin Feb 25 '12 at 13:55
1  
You are using C - so try/catch is not apart of that language! Look up the man page for sscanf. It returns an int to tell you if failure occured. –  Ed Heal Feb 25 '12 at 14:19
    
To handle failure, you would actually need strtol rather than atoi. –  jørgensen Feb 25 '12 at 15:03

I don't think there is any standard function to do this. This is such a common operation that most programmers have something like the following code in their personal toolkit. The answer lies in using the strtol() function. I quickly hacked the following from the man page for strtol:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int
main (int argc, char *argv[])
{

  char sep = ',';  
  char string[] = "  312 ,, 22 ,+12 ,-12 ,5331";
  /*
   * count separators
   */
  char *str = string;
  int j = 0;
  while (*str)
    {
      printf ("str=%c\n", *str);
      if (*str == sep)
    j++;
      str++;
    }
  int n = j + 1;
  printf ("n=%d\n", n);
  long int *arr = malloc (n * sizeof (long int));

  char *endptr = NULL;
  str = string;
  j = 0;
  do
    {
      arr[j++] = strtol (str, &endptr, 10);
      if (*endptr != '\0')
    {
      while (*endptr != sep)
        endptr++;
      str = endptr + 1;
    }
    }
  while (j < n && *endptr);
  for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {
      printf ("%d:%ld\n", j, arr[j]);
    }
  exit (EXIT_SUCCESS);

} /* main */

Hope this is helpful

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This code is thread-safe - other solutions using strtok should use strtok_r instead to make it thread-safe –  Major Eccles Feb 25 '12 at 15:14
    
The code posted by Gandaro is incorrect. It mallocs currnum before calling strtok. currnum is just a pointer into the array numbers_str. Also the array numbers_str will be modified by strtok by inserting nulls where the first separator is found. If the string is in the read-only data segment this code will fail. convention in these cases is to copy the string using strdup. –  Major Eccles Feb 25 '12 at 15:27

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