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I have a custom view class which is a subclass of UITableViewCell.

I have two other custom view classes which inherit from this subclass (they share a lot of the same properties but were different enough to warrant separate classes).

I've declared the shared properties in MyParentCell and also declared their unique properties in the respective classes.

UITableViewCell
      |
      |
 MyParentCell // defines propertyA and propertyB, both IBOutlet subviews
     / \
    /   \
   /     \
  |       |
  |     ChildClass1 // defines propertyC, an IBOutlet subview
  |
ChildClass2 // defines property D, an IBOutlet subview

My question is: Since I'm using ARC and cannot explicitly call [super delloc]; when I'm defining dealloc: in ChildClass1 and ChildClass2 do, I have to release all of the subviews they own in each class, or will MyParentCell#dealloc still be called too?

i.e.,

Do I have to write this:

// ChildClass1.m
@implementation ChildClass1

-(void)dealloc
{
    self.propertyA = nil;
    self.propertyB = nil;
    self.propertyC = nil;
}
@end

// ChildClass2.m
@implementation ChildClass2

-(void)dealloc
{
    self.propertyA = nil;
    self.propertyB = nil;
    self.propertyD = nil;
}
@end

Or is it enough to write:

// MyParentCell
@implementation MyParentCell

-(void)dealloc
{
    self.propertyA = nil;
    self.propertyB = nil;
}
@end

// ChildCell1.m
@implementation ChildCell1

-(void)dealloc
{
    self.propertyC = nil;
}
@end    

// ChildCell2.m
@implementation ChildCell2

-(void)dealloc
{
    self.propertyD = nil;
}
@end

If the second approach is fine, can someone explain when and how MyParentCell#dealloc is called?

If the first approach is necessary, that sucks :/

share|improve this question
    
Setting self.property to nil is still recommended only when using .xib and IBOutlets in viewDidUnload, in your case it's most certainly not needed. Though it's your concern if ARC is actually nil-ing this properties is understandable :) –  rokjarc Feb 25 '12 at 14:05
    
I'm loading a custom xib file into a Table - As far as I'm aware viewDidUnload is a UIViewController event so won't be called in the case of a custom subview. Does that mean that I don't have to worry about setting it's subviews to nil at all? –  bodacious Feb 25 '12 at 14:11
    
you're right - my point was that there settomg to nil would still be recommended. in your case it is not needed. –  rokjarc Feb 25 '12 at 14:28
    
OK - thanks for the advice :) –  bodacious Feb 25 '12 at 14:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Of course, also with ARC every class is responsible to clean up only its own resources. If you define a dealloc in a subclass, it's calling the parent's dealloc implicitly at the end of your method. You just don't have to type it.

If you just release instance variables or properties, you can rely on ARC to do this for you after the whole dealloc chain is done. ARC silently implements .cxx_destruct which gets called from NSObject's dealloc and takes care of releasing anything strong in your class.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation - I understand now that dealloc will be called in superclasses too so I don't have to worry about doing that. I've always thought that each class should clean up their own resources but the other comments on this post say that with ARC this is not required. any thoughts? –  bodacious Feb 25 '12 at 14:45

No not need to use dealloc at all as a general rule(but in some cases), put ain dealloc an NSLog that shows just a dealloc word. Run and trust in ARC everything happen automatically

share|improve this answer

You don't have to do neither approach 1 nor approach 2. You don't need to implement dealloc at all. When an instance of your subclasses is deallocated, objects it retains will be released automatically. So if they are not retained somewhere else, they will be deallocated too.

share|improve this answer
    
OK - So even if the property attribute is a strong one, it's unlikely that there will be any shared ownership so it's automatically deallocated when the parent view is? –  bodacious Feb 25 '12 at 14:08
    
What do you mean by shared ownership? –  sch Feb 25 '12 at 14:12
    
Another UIView subclass instance having strong (retain) ownership of the same property - I guess in the case of subviews that's very unlikely to happen without some really bad coding though? –  bodacious Feb 25 '12 at 14:15

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