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I want to retain a variable between postbacks, so I write an accessor to put it into viewstate. Which one of these is the best way to access it? Or is there a better option?

Option 1:

private int Status
{
    get
    {
    	try
    	{
    		return (int)ViewState[@"__Status"];
    	}
    	catch
    	{
    		return 0;
    	}
    }
    set
    {
        ViewState[@"__Status"] = value;
    }
}

Option 2:

private int Status
{
    get
    {
        if (ViewState[@"__Status"] is int)
        {
            return (int)ViewState[@"__Status"];
        }
        else
        {
            return 0;
        }
    }
    set
    {
        ViewState[@"__Status"] = value;
    }
}

Thanks

Edit: I'm using C# 2.0

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's the way that I tend to do it:

private int Status
{
  get { return (ViewState["MYSTATUS"] != null) ? (int)ViewState["MYSTATUS"] : 0; }
  set { ViewState["MYSTATUS"] = value; }
}
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Forgot about this method, I've used it before as well - trying to make my code more consistant.. As the viewstate variable will only be read / changed by this accessor, the explicit cast (if not null) should be fine. Thanks. –  Nick Jun 3 '09 at 13:13

Well, option 2 won't compile, but I think it's the right direction. ;-) Try not to use an exception for this. Inspect the ViewState variable instead.

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Oops, dumb error. Corrected, thanks. –  Nick Jun 3 '09 at 13:03

Not exactly an answer, is it reasonable to assume that null is the same as 0. Why not use int? and the property type, then I think you could do something like this:

public int? MyProperty
{
    get
    {
        return ViewState["status"] as int?;

    }
    set
    {
        ViewState["status"] = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Depending upon the assumptions that the code is making, you might start seeing errors pop-up if you allow the value returned to be null, or you would have to add additional code to check for null. –  SecretSquirrel Jun 3 '09 at 12:59

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