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Following the answer to one of my questions of a tree-walking algorithm

MLM downline distribution count

I want to walk the entire tree of users and print the nodes but I get a strange error message:

TypeError: 'User' object is not iterable

This is the code I tried to run to walk the tree:

    downlinestack = []
    distributor=self
    downlinestack += User.query(User.sponsor == distributor.key).fetch(99999999)
    while downlinestack:
        downline = downlinestack.pop()
        logging.info('downline: %s' %str(downline))
        for person in downline:
            downlinestack.append(User.query(User.sponsor == person.key).fetch(99999999))
            logging.info('person: %s' %str(person.key.id()))

How should I change the code so that it walks the tree of users connected via the sponsor property?

Thank you

Update

I found a recursive solution, it looks like this:

def downline(self, person, team, teamlist):
    firstline = User.query(User.sponsor == person.key).fetch(99999999)
    if firstline:
        for person in firstline:
            teamlist.append(person)
            newdownline = self.downline(person, team, teamlist)        
            team.append(newdownline)
    return teamlist           

def this_month_non_manager_silver(self):
    silver = 0
    today = date.today()
    timeline = date(today.year, today.month, 1)
    for person in self.downline(self, [], []):
        logging.info('element:%s' % str(person.key.id()) )
        orders = model.Order.all().filter('distributor_id =',
                    person.key.id()).filter('created >',
                    timeline).filter('status =', 'PAID'
                    ).fetch(999999)
        for order in orders:
            for (idx, item) in enumerate(order.items):
                purchase = model.Item.get_by_id(long(item.id()))
                amount = int(order.amounts[idx])
                silver = silver + amount * purchase.silver \
                        / 1000.000            
    return silver
share|improve this question
1  
Which exact line throws the TypeError? It'd help narrow it down immensely. –  Karl Barker Feb 25 '12 at 14:48
    
The line for person in downline fails. –  909 Niklas Feb 25 '12 at 14:51
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not just two nested for's?

for downline in User.query(User.sponsor == distributor.key).fetch(99999999):
    logging.info('downline: %s' %str(downline))
    for person in downline:
        downlinestack.append(User.query(User.sponsor == person.key).fetch(99999999))
        logging.info('person: %s' %str(person.key.id()))
share|improve this answer
    
I think that will work. I also found a recursive solution that I posted in an update. –  909 Niklas Feb 27 '12 at 7:57
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The line

downlinestack += User.query(User.sponsor == distributor.key).fetch(99999999)

expects the RHS to return a list to extend downlinestack with.

>>> a = ['a']
>>> a += ['b']
>>> a
['a', 'b']

Unless User.query().fetch() returns a list, I suspect that what you meant was

downlinstack.append(downlinestack += User.query(User.sponsor == distributor.key).fetch(99999999))

My other guess is that whatever you're appending into downlinestack isn't iterable, so the following line fails

for person in downline:
share|improve this answer
    
The line for person in downline fails. –  909 Niklas Feb 25 '12 at 14:50
1  
Which out of += and .append() do you mean to use? [] += [a,b] = [a,b], whereas [].append([a,b]) = [[a,b]], looks like you want the second one. Excuse the pseudocode. –  Karl Barker Feb 25 '12 at 14:53
    
OK...I just want to print something from every node of the tree and I don't know about the details. I think it should be a regular tree algorithm but I couldn't succeed. –  909 Niklas Feb 25 '12 at 15:49
    
User.query().fetch() does indeed return a list of User objects. The variable you have called 'downline' is a single User object, not a list of them. –  Greg Feb 25 '12 at 22:01
    
Thank you for the comments. I found a recursive solution that I'm using and I've updated the question with it. –  909 Niklas Feb 27 '12 at 7:54
add comment

Let me clarify by going through the code line by line:

downlinestack = []
distributor=self
downlinestack += User.query(User.sponsor == distributor.key).fetch(99999999)

First of all, you haven't told us what User.query returns. I'm assuming it's a list of user objects. So now downlinestack looks like this: [User1, User2, User3]

while downlinestack:
    downline = downlinestack.pop()

Now downline contains a single user popped from the end of the stack, User3.

    logging.info('downline: %s' %str(downline))
    for person in downline:

Here's your error: User3 is not iterable. There's no mystery: it's just not that kind of object. It's not a collection of items that can be accessed in turn, iteratively. If you want to iterate over something here, you have to produce the iterable yourself.

There are two possible ways to do so. The first is to iterate over the list returned by User.query:

distributor=self
downlinestack = User.query(User.sponsor == distributor.key).fetch(99999999)
while downlinestack:
    top_person = downlinestack.pop()
    logging.info('top_person: %s' %str(top_person))
    for person in User.query(User.sponsor == top_person.key).fetch(99999999):
        downlinestack.append(person)

Your other option is to make downlinestack into a list of lists:

distributor=self
downlinestack = [User.query(User.sponsor == distributor.key).fetch(99999999)]
while downlinestack:
    downline_top = downlinestack.pop()
    for person in downline_top:
        downlinestack.append(User.query(User.sponsor == person.key).fetch(99999999))
        logging.info('person: %s' %str(person.key.id()))

Either of these should work.

I don't have enough context to test the above, but I created my own simplified test scheme just to illustrate the fact that this really does work.

>>> query_tree = {0: [1, 2, 3], 1: [4, 5], 2: [6], 3: [7, 8, 9, 10], 4: [], 
                  5: [11, 12], 6: [], 7: [], 8: [13], 9: [], 10: [], 11: [14], 
                  12: [], 13: [], 14: []}
>>> stack = query_tree[0][:]   #make a copy to avoid changes to `query_tree`
>>> while stack:
...     top_person = stack.pop()
...     print top_person
...     for person in query_tree[top_person]:
...         stack.append(person)
... 
3
10
9
8
13
7
2
6
1
5
12
11
14
4

As you can see, this prints out every person's id in the query tree (except for the root id, 0).

Then the other approach:

>>> stack = [query_tree[0]]
>>> while stack:
...     top_person_list = stack.pop()
...     for person in top_person_list:
...         print person
...         stack.append(query_tree[person])
... 
1
2
3
7
8
9
10
13
6
4
5
11
12
14
share|improve this answer
    
I thought of making a list of lists but that seems a roundabout way to do it when I just want to walk the tree and add something from every node. It should be a common regular algorithm but I still couldn't manage to do it. I'm updating the question with my efforts. If all else fails I will try a recursive algorithm but that will be much more difficult to implement than the iterative solution. –  909 Niklas Feb 25 '12 at 15:51
    
@NickRosencrantz, There's nothing roundabout about it. See my edited answer. The above two solutions are equivalent, and equally obvious to me. –  senderle Feb 25 '12 at 18:11
    
@senderie thanks a lot for the elaboration. In the meantime I found a recursive solution with which I've updated the original question and that recursion appears to work for me. –  909 Niklas Feb 27 '12 at 7:56
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