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In Cprogramming.com I found this piece of code:

int a,b;
scanf("%d %d",&a,&b);
b=(a+b)-(a=b);
printf("%d %d",a,b);

It is claimed to be a tip/trick to "swap without using temporary". My tests on Linux gcc prove it. However, wouldn't the order how different compilers or platforms computing this expression matters here? Is it safe to use such code?

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Yeah, 'cos using a temp variable is such a terrible thing to do!!! –  David Heffernan Feb 25 '12 at 18:21
    
Recent discussion on this "trick", expanding on what @DavidHeffernan mentions. –  Brett Hale Feb 25 '12 at 21:00
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

No. In the expression (a+b)-(a=b) there is no sequence point between a being written to and a being read in the (a+b) sub-expression to determine the value to be stored to b so the behaviour is undefined.

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even if there were a sequence point, it still wouldn't be portable because of potential integer overflow; see also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XOR_swap_algorithm#Variations –  Christoph Feb 25 '12 at 16:49
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However, wouldn't the order how different compilers or platforms computing this expression matters here?

Yes.

Is it safe to use such code?

No, it's undefined behavior.

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