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I'm using EF 4.3 with Ninject. I have a simple DataContext and I've created an interface for it. It's a simple interface:

public interface IMyDataContext
{
    DbSet<ComplexType> ComplexTypes { get; set; }

    int SaveChanges();
}

Implementation of MyDataContext:

    public class MyDataContext : DbContext, IMyDataContext
{
    public DbSet<ComplexType> ComplexTypes { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder); //Not sure if this is necessary.. 

        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
    }
}

And I'm adding it to NInject:

Kernel.Bind<IMyDataContext>().To<MyDataContext>();

Using the connection string name MyDataContext doesn't work and if I use IMyDataContext, it generates another database named the full assembly name. Only one table/class is mapped.. not sure if that has anything to do with it.

  <connectionStrings>
    <add name="MyDataContext"
     connectionString="Server=MyPc\SQLEXPRESS;Database=MyDataContext;Persist Security Info=True;Integrated Security=true;MultipleActiveResultSets=True"
     providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />

I know I can override the constructor on the data context.... but I thought this was supposed to "auto map". Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just do a

Kernel.Bind<IMyDataContext()
    .To<MyDataContext()
    .WithConstructorArgument("nameOrConnectionString", "MyDataContext");

In conjunction with this:

public class MyDataContext : IMyDbContext, DbContext
{
    public MyDataContext (string nameOrConnectionString) 
       : base(nameOrConnectionString) { }
}

To avoid any problem.

Also what is mapped depends on your DbSet<> declaration on your DbContext, you should also post the MyDataContext implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - added the implementation above. I was hoping for a way to just use the name of the datacontext - but I think this is juts as easy. Appreciate it. – Shibbz Feb 25 '12 at 23:27

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