Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I query a A resource record towards an authoritative nameserver:

dig A laksjdfdjf.back2hack.cc

I recieve for every stupid and silly subdomain (in this case 'laksjdfdjf') a positive answer:

; <<>> DiG 9.8.1 <<>> A laksjdfdjf.back2hack.cc ;; global options: +cmd ;; Got answer: ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 31662 ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0

;; QUESTION SECTION: ;laksjdfdjf.back2hack.cc. IN A

;; ANSWER SECTION: laksjdfdjf.back2hack.cc. 249 IN A 109.163.226.139

;; Query time: 14 msec ;; SERVER: 192.168.1.1#53(192.168.1.1) ;; WHEN: Sat Feb 25 17:44:05 2012 ;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 57

How can I now distinguish a true, valid subdomain from a junk subdomain if the authoritative nameserver treats every query like that? Why are they even configured like this? To prevent brute forcing the valid subdomains?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You could do a reverse query on the returned IP, and compare the expected value with the returned value?

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah that sound's like a good plan. Never thought about this. Thanks –  Nikolai Tschacher Feb 25 '12 at 17:04
    
EDIT:But that doesn't work in this case: I have 2 domains: tut0r1al.back2hack.cc (does exist) and s34fj34kFskjdf.back2hack.cc (not existant). Both, A/AAAA and reverse queries are the same for the examples above: You cannot say which one is a valid subdomain, until you try to access the services (in this case http), when you see that the one offers content... –  Nikolai Tschacher Feb 25 '12 at 17:14
    
Seems that as far as DNS is concerned, any back2hack.cc subdomain is a 'valid' one - you actually want to know which ones serve content... –  Karl Barker Feb 25 '12 at 17:20
    
Yep exactly. I guess the reason for this server side behaviour is to prevent hackers from brute forcing subdomains in their foot priting procedure. Or are there ather reasons which could explain this configuration? –  Nikolai Tschacher Feb 25 '12 at 17:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.