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I have been working on some code that is similar to the following:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned char x;
    unsigned short y;
    unsigned char[NUM_DEFINED_ELSEWHERE];
} My_Struct;

static My_Struct my_useful_struct;   // Variables initialized elsewhere in code.

void myFunction(const My_Struct * p_my_struct)
{
    /* Performs various read-only actions utilizing p_my_struct. */
}

void myOtherFunction(void)
{
    static My_Struct * p_struct = &my_useful_struct;
    myFunction(p_struct);
}

My code compiles without any problems, but when reviewed I was told that unless I typecast p_struct that this could lead to undefined behavior on certain platforms (i.e. 8051). However, I never even received a warning on the compiler. Is it true that not typecasting the pointer when passing it to the function with (const My_Struct *) could lead to undefined behavior?

The reason that I declared the above function with a pointer to const was because I wanted to be able to handle both a pointer to const and a pointer. Is it bad coding practice not to typecast in the above situation?

Thanks for your help!

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4  
(pedantic note: if it's undefined behaviour then it's undefined on all platforms, it just so happens that you get unlucky and it "works" on some) –  Flexo Feb 25 '12 at 17:44
1  
Your code should not compile: static My_Struct p_struct = &my_useful_struct; is illegal. Only pointers can receive the address of something... –  Basile Starynkevitch Feb 25 '12 at 17:45
    
I think you messed up myOtherFunction() - you probably want p_struct to be a pointer and remove the & from the following invocation... –  Christoph Feb 25 '12 at 17:46
    
as @Christoph said, this shouldn't compile –  jupp0r Feb 25 '12 at 17:47
2  
Every pointer type T * is implicitly convertible to T const *, so there is no need for a cast (and indeed this is perfectly logical). –  Kerrek SB Feb 25 '12 at 18:07
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is absolutely fine; the compiler performs an implicit conversion from My_Struct * to const My_Struct *. §6.3.2.3 of the C99 spec says:

For any qualifier q, a pointer to a non-q-qualified type may be converted to a pointer to the q-qualified version of the type; the values stored in the original and converted pointers shall compare equal.

Furthermore, even if you declare the function with two inconsistent declarations, such that one file sees it declared like this:

void myFunction(My_Struct * p_my_struct);

even though it's actually defined like this:

void myFunction(const My_Struct * p_my_struct) { ... }

even that is allowed by the spec, even though the compiler doesn't know to perform an implicit conversion, because My_Struct * and const My_Struct * have the same representation (so the conversion is a no-op, anyway).

(Thanks to Christoph and awoodland for their comments clarifying the latter situation. In a previous version of this answer, I wrongly claimed that that would be undefined behavior.)

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actually, My_Struct * and const My_Struct * are required to be identical internally (see C99 6.2.5 §27), but as far as I know, you are correct that the two declarations are technically incompatible and using the wrong one is undefined behaviour... –  Christoph Feb 25 '12 at 18:16
    
So what is the solution, casting before calling the function? –  jupp0r Feb 25 '12 at 18:20
    
@jupp0r: using the correct prototype? –  Christoph Feb 25 '12 at 18:23
    
@Christoph: no, that should be defined behavior, right? Given the incorrect prototype. –  jupp0r Feb 25 '12 at 18:31
    
@jupp0r: Firstly -- Christoph means that the solution is: "using the correct prototype". Secondly -- given the incorrect prototype, an explicit cast wouldn't work, because if you explicitly cast it to a const My_Struct *, then the compiler will want to implicitly convert it right back to match the prototype! (And that implicit conversion is illegal, not to mention inadvisable.) –  ruakh Feb 25 '12 at 18:36
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Type casting constness onto or off of things is something I consider bad practice - there is generally nothing wrong with passing a non-const pointer into a function expecting a const one.

The exception is if there is some reason that the data can change part way through the execution (e.g. another thread touching the data pointed at) - then you might have a problem, but its not the sort of problem that typecasting will prevent. In this case you need to make your logic thread safe.

Don't forget that the const keyword can't be used by the compiler to guarantee constness either, although it can be used to detect problems where you think data should not change, but the compiler expects that you want to change it... its more of a documentation tool for you than anything else.

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const-qualifying the pointed-to type makes absolutely no guarantee about mutability of the pointed-to object - it's purely syntactic, as adding a qualifier is an implicit conversion, whereas removing one is not... –  Christoph Feb 25 '12 at 18:00
    
[addendum] except when coupled with restrict, but even then only if the object is actually accessed... –  Christoph Feb 25 '12 at 18:37
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First I assume the & in the myFunction(&p_struct) call is a typo and what you really meant is myFunction(p_struct).

static My_Struct * p_struct = &my_useful_struct;
myFunction(p_struct);

When you pass p_struct there is absolutely no reason to cast the p_struct pointer in the function call. This is perfectly valid to pass a pointer to T in a function where the parameter is pointer to const T.

In the C Standard this is ruled by the constraints of the assignment operator (C99, 6.5.16.1p1). In a function call of a function declared with a prototype, the arguments are converted as if by assignment to the type of the corresponding parameters (C99, 6.5.2.2p7).

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You're right.. I have edited the above code. Thanks. –  embedded_guy Feb 25 '12 at 18:13
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This works for me and I don't think the const pointer parameter yields undefined behavior, the compiler does an implicit conversion before calling the function:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned char x;
    unsigned short y;
    unsigned char[NUM_DEFINED_ELSEWHERE];
} My_Struct;

static My_Struct my_useful_struct;   // Variables initialized elsewhere in code.

void myFunction(const My_Struct * p_my_struct)
{
    /* Performs various read-only actions utilizing p_my_struct. */
}

void myOtherFunction(void)
{
    static My_Struct * p_struct = &my_useful_struct;
    myFunction(p_struct);
}
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