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I'm trying to store some data in the array call holder and the problem is that when I display that array nothing being store in it and I don't know what is wrong even though the logic seem to be right for me. The data is coming from an array call sender I'm using two dimension array to store it up to 5 at MAX.

        for (int t = 0; t < strlen(sender) && stop == false; t++){ // stop is the bool that created to break the loop
            if (sender[t] != ';'){ // all the data being store in the holder will be separated by ';'
                holder[d][t] = sender[t];
            }
            if (sender[t] == ';') // if the sender at position of 't' number meet ';' then plus one to start store the next data
                d++;
            if (holder[d][t] == '\0'){ // if it meet the '\0' then exit from the for loop
                holder[d][t] = '\0';   // If `;` found, null terminate the copied destination.
                stop = true;

            }
        }

This is the sender array "Hello;How;Is;Good Bye"

The output is

Your holder-----> '

Actual holder---> 'Hello'

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1  
Is there a starting value for d? (before the loop?) holder[d][t] = sender[t]; –  Ofir Baruch Feb 25 '12 at 17:58
4  
Please could you indent your code snippet properly? –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 25 '12 at 17:58
    
@OfirBaruch yes, it's initialize to 0 –  Ali Feb 25 '12 at 17:59
    
@OliCharlesworth So sorry I'm trying my best to do it the way you guys want –  Ali Feb 25 '12 at 18:00
1  
What's the purpose of this code? –  Ofir Baruch Feb 25 '12 at 18:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't understand why you're not allowed to use break. Maybe you could clarify the objective of the exercise? Otherwise, maybe this code solves your problem? I would normally have used another technique, but since you said that you're not allowed to use break...

int pos = 0, col = 0, row = 0;
do {
  if(';' == sender[pos] || 0 == sender[pos]) {
    holder[row++][col] = 0;
    col = 0;
  } else {
    holder[row][col++] = sender[pos];
  }
} while(0 != sender[pos++]);
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, I was in the process of posting almost identical code with a for loop. –  Blastfurnace Feb 25 '12 at 19:15
1  
@Blastfurnace Yep, I would've used a for loop too, with a check for 0 inside and a break to get out, but without the possibility to use break I figured this was better since you need to terminate the last substring somehow. (Doing it outside of the loop seems ugly to me.) –  Anders Sjöqvist Feb 25 '12 at 19:22
1  
Thanks this code worked for me I will just probably going to figure out the way to write it in my own way :/ –  Ali Feb 25 '12 at 19:26
1  
You can just run the for loop index from 0 to strlen(sender) inclusive, no break needed and it correctly terminates the last string. –  Blastfurnace Feb 25 '12 at 19:27
1  
@Ali That's the right attitude! :) –  Anders Sjöqvist Feb 25 '12 at 19:30

One issue is that you are using t for both the index for holder and the index for your input string. This may work for the first section, but not for the ones afterwards.

You also want to store a null terminator when you hit a semicolon.

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Well, I didn't though of that one, but even the first one didn't seem to work? :( –  Ali Feb 25 '12 at 18:02

There's a problem with the last condition if (holder[d][t] == '\0'). There are 2 chars in this condition (\0) but the holder[d][t] is only one char, therefore this condition will never be true. What's about the next code?

int aStringLength = strlen(sender);
int t = 0;
while( stop == false )
{
 if(t == aStringLength)
   stop = true;

 if(sender[t] != ';')
 {
   holder[d][i] = sender[t];
   i++;
 }
 else
 {
   d++;
   i = 0;
 }

 t++;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You could write for(int t=0; ; ++t) instead of using a while loop and two additional statements. There's no null termination after the substrings at the moment. Also, why not break out of the loop instead of assigning a boolean flag? –  Anders Sjöqvist Feb 25 '12 at 18:54
    
Hi, Thanks and I'm still getting empty result :( –  Ali Feb 25 '12 at 18:58
1  
@aliquis , you're right. Ali , let's break this code up - add a printing command to all the variables in each and every step. We are missing here somehthing. –  Ofir Baruch Feb 25 '12 at 19:01
    
@aliquis break was not permit in the assignment so we have to use other option. –  Ali Feb 25 '12 at 19:02
1  
Simply add printf ("Characters: %c %d %d \n", sender[t], t , d); before the end of the loop and write the output of it. –  Ofir Baruch Feb 25 '12 at 19:09

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