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I have a 2-dimensional array and I am passing it into a function to carry out certain operations. I'd like to know the correct way of doing it...

#define numRows 3
#define numCols 7
#define TotalNum (numRows*numCols)
int arr[numRows][numCols] = {{0,1,2,3,4,5,6}, {7,8,9,10,11,12,13},{14,15,16,17,18,19,20}};

void display(int **p)
{
    printf("\n");
    for (int i = 0; i< numRows;i++)
    {
        for ( int j = 0;j< numCols;j++)
        {
            printf("%i\t",p[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

int main() {
    display(arr);
}

I get an error message:

'display': cannot convert parameter1 from 'int' to 'int*'

Is this the correct way of passing a 2-dimensional array into a function? If not, what is the correct way?

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See my answer below. –  jupp0r Feb 25 '12 at 18:23
1  
possible duplicate of C -- passing a 2d array as a function argument? –  Bo Persson Feb 25 '12 at 21:03
    
small tip : use CAPS for macros, this is the common practice and can make your code much clearer to outsiders –  Shmil The Cat Mar 14 at 11:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 25 down vote accepted

You should declare your function like this:

void display(int p[][numCols])

This C FAQ thoroughly explains why. The gist of it is that arrays decay into pointers once, it doesn't happen recursively. An array of arrays decays into a pointer to an array, not into a pointer to a pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
i have a question. this function is to display it but if it used to change the values in the arr? –  lakesh Feb 25 '12 at 19:22
    
@lakesh It should work. –  cnicutar Feb 25 '12 at 19:38
    
@cnicutar, so we cannot convert int*[20] to int**. Is this the reason? –  user3801433 Oct 31 at 6:37

If (like in your case), you know the dimensions of the array at compilation-time, you can write justvoid display(int p[][numCols]).

Some explanation: You probably know that when you pass an array to a function, you actually pass a pointer to the first member. In C language, 2D array is just an array of arrays. Because of that, you should pass the function a pointer to the first sub-array in the 2D array. So, the natural way, is to say int (*p)[numCols] (that means p is a pointer, to an array of numCols ints). In function declaration, you have the "shortcut" p[], that means exactly the same thing like (*p) (But tells the reader, that you pass a pointer to a beginning of array, and not to just an one variable)

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thanks for the explaination.... –  lakesh Feb 25 '12 at 20:09

You are doing in wrong way. You can pass 2-d array with the help of pointer to an array, or simply pass an array or through Single pointer.

#define numRows 3
#define numCols 7
void display(int (*p)[numcols],int numRows,int numCols)//First method//
void dispaly(int *p,int numRows,int numCols) //Second Method//
void dispaly (int p[][numCols],int numRows,int numCols)  //Third Method
{
    printf("\n");
    for (int i = 0; i< numRows;i++)
    {
        for ( int j = 0;j< numCols;j++)
        {
            printf("%i\t",p[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

int main() {
    display(arr,numRows,numCols);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Macro conflicts with variable names. –  Jarod42 Dec 23 '13 at 3:43
    
Method 2 doesn't compile. –  Jarod42 Dec 23 '13 at 3:52

Declare it simply

void display(int (*p)[numCols][numRows]);

This way your p pointer conveys all necessary informations and you can extract all the dimensions from it without repeating numCols and numRows over and over.

void display(int (*p)[numCols][numRows])
{
   size_t i, j;

   printf("sizeof array=%zu\n", sizeof *p);
   printf("sizeof array[]=%zu\n", sizeof **p);
   printf("sizeof array[][]=%zu\n", sizeof ***p);

   size_t dim_y = sizeof *p / sizeof **p;
   printf("dim_y = %zu\n", dim_y);

   size_t dim_x = sizeof **p / sizeof ***p;
   printf("dim_x = %zu\n", dim_x);

   for(i=0; i<dim_y; i++) {
      puts("");
      for(j=0; j<dim_x; j++)
         printf(" %6d", (*p)[i][j]);
   }
}

This is particularly interesting if you use typedefs (which I don't like btw)

 typedef int matrix[5][6];

In that case the dimensions are not visible in the signature of the function but the function will still have the correct values for the dimensions.

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