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lets say I want to iterate through an array of doubles and sum them. I have two ways to do this.

A)

double sum (double * series, int size) {
    double sum = 0.0;
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        sum += *series++;
    }
    return sum;
}

B)

double sum (double * series, int size) {
    double sum = 0.0;
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        sum += series[i];
    }
    return sum;
}

which is better and why / when should I use one over the other.

share|improve this question
    
I like B) because it's shorter and easier to understand if you don't know how pointers work. You can use vectors with std::accumulate too. – chris Feb 25 '12 at 18:28
    
Style A isn't as clear to me what you are accomplishing. Personally, I always choose style B, coming from a C# background. – Richard J. Ross III Feb 25 '12 at 18:28
    
@Richard J. Ross III, *series evaluates to the data contained in what series is pointing to. The loop increments series so it points to the next element in the array each time. – chris Feb 25 '12 at 18:30
    
@chris I understand what is happening, but it requires a double-take for me, as I said, I just find B easier to read. – Richard J. Ross III Feb 25 '12 at 18:31
1  
There's some unnecessary stuff in A... I'm going to change it. That said, I would use B over A, but return std::accumulate(series,series+size,0.0) over either. – bames53 Feb 25 '12 at 19:28
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is a question of readability, it should not affect performance. I think B is the most readable, and therefore preferable.

I could also propose a third variant, which is range-based (note the begin and end parameters):

double sum (double* begin, double* end) {
    double sum = 0.;
    for (double* it = begin; it != end; ++it) {
        sum += *it;
    }
    return sum;
}

This is idiomatic C++ in many cases and generalizes more easily. That is not to say that it is always preferable, it is just another variant in a question about readability and maintainability.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is basically what std::accumulate does with vectors. – chris Feb 25 '12 at 18:31
    
Let’s hope that begin < end. What happens if begin == end? – Simon Wright Feb 25 '12 at 21:23
1  
@SimonWright: Then it won't enter the loop, and return 0 right away. The loop condition is checked before entering the body :) – Magnus Hoff Feb 25 '12 at 22:05
    
Oh, sorry, I was forgetting that end is 1 past the end. – Simon Wright Feb 26 '12 at 10:44

I would chose style B as well, but then you should prefer standard algorithms over explicit loops:

#include <numeric>

double sum(const double* const series, const int size) {
    return std::accumulate(series, series + size, 0.0);
}
share|improve this answer

Neither is inherently better than the other; you should choose whichever makes the intention of your code clearest. With any modern compiler, they should be optimised to identical machine code.


Note, however, that passing around raw pointers to raw arrays is considered bad style in C++. Consider using a container class such as std::vector.

share|improve this answer

In terms of performance there should be no difference when you use modern optimizing compiles.

Back in 1978, the first way was somewhat faster on PDP-11, because indirect autoincrement addressing required fewer cycles to process, and there was no optimizers capable of converting index+offset to autoincrement.

P.S. Setting series -= size; has no effect, because series is passed by value.

share|improve this answer
    
series -= size; sets the series to point back to first item right? – Patrick Lorio Feb 25 '12 at 18:30
1  
@PatrickLorio Yes, but it does it on the copy of the pointer, which is passed by value. Since you are returning on the next line without accessing series after the assignment, this assignment has no effect. It would make sense if you were to use that pointer again, for example to find the largest or smallest element in addition to finding the sum. – dasblinkenlight Feb 25 '12 at 18:32
3  
@PatrickLorio It doesn't matter. Because the actual pointer passed in is passed by value, when you -= the size it doesn't effect the variable that was passed in initially. – Richard J. Ross III Feb 25 '12 at 18:32
1  
Yes, but it's not needed. Why do you think it is? [Sorry, I just missed the two previous comments saying exactly this, but I can't delete the comment. --Dale] – Dale Hagglund Feb 25 '12 at 18:34
    
@DaleHagglund new to C++ from java/C#, just didn't know. – Patrick Lorio Feb 25 '12 at 18:36

The C++11 way to iterate the array (if you don't want to just sum them and that accumulate doesn't fit your need) is:

double sum (const double * series, int size) { 
    double sum = 0.0; 
    for_each (series, series + size, [&](double v) { 
        sum += v;
    });
    return sum; 
} 

Note that if you used a vector or a list you'd get pretty much the same code:

double sum (const vector<double>& series) { 
    double sum = 0.0; 
    for_each (begin(series), end(series), [&](double v) { 
        sum += v;
    });
    return sum; 
} 
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