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If I have a method which returns a value (for example the Remove method of Dictionary class returns a bool), what happens if I do not assign the return value to a variable? In other words, if I write dictionary.Remove("plugin-01"); without assigning the result to a bool variable, what are the differences in compilation with respect to bool b = dictionary.Remove("plugin-01");?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Let's look at a simple example and the IL code it is producing (courtesy of LinqPad)

void Main()
{
    Bar();
    Baz();
}

bool Bar()
{
  return true;
}

void Baz()
{
  Console.WriteLine("placeholder");
}

This produces the following IL:

IL_0000:  ldarg.0     
IL_0001:  call        UserQuery.Bar
IL_0006:  pop          //remove current value from evaluation stack
IL_0007:  ldarg.0     
IL_0008:  call        UserQuery.Baz


Bar:
IL_0000:  ldc.i4.1    
IL_0001:  ret    

Baz:
IL_0000:  ldstr       "placeholder"
IL_0005:  call        System.Console.WriteLine
IL_000A:  ret   

You can see Bar is called and then a pop to remove the boolean return value from the evaluation stack - it's going nowhere. I had to update the example to include another method call to Baz() otherwise the pop would not be emitted, since the program ends.

Now let's look at a case where we actually use the return value:

void Main()
{
    bool foo = Bar();
    Console.WriteLine(foo);
}

bool Bar()
{
  return true;
}

This produces the following IL:

IL_0000:  ldarg.0     
IL_0001:  call        UserQuery.Bar
IL_0006:  stloc.0    //pops current value from evaluation stack, stores in local var
IL_0007:  ldloc.0     
IL_0008:  call        System.Console.WriteLine

Bar:
IL_0000:  ldc.i4.1    
IL_0001:  ret 

Ignore the System.Console.WriteLine part which is everything after and including IL_007 - just had to add it so the compiler does not optimize away the use of the variable. You see that the result of the Bar method call is popped from the evaluation stack and stored in the local variable foo. That is the difference - either a pop, which grabs and drops the return value or a stloc.0 to assign the result to a variable.

So if you do not need the results of a method call you should just ignore the result. Even if you assign the result to a variable and that variable is never used, the compiler might completely optimize away the variable and the assignment - at least in release mode (in debug mode most optimizations are disabled to improve your debugging experience).

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If you remove Console.WriteLine(foo), should the IL be equal to the first example? –  enzom83 Feb 25 '12 at 19:00
1  
Yes it is - it is optimized away (presumably) because the variable foo is never used. –  BrokenGlass Feb 25 '12 at 19:01
    
In your first "This produces the following IL", I think you should include the POP instruction that follows the call. This clarifies that the method result is on the MSIL stack and the caller has to handle it somehow (even if "handling" it means explicitly throwing it away) –  Corey Kosak Feb 25 '12 at 22:07
    
@CoreyKosak: I showed the complete IL output as produced by LinqPad - but you are correct - there should be a pop, in this case it just was not emitted because the program ended before making any other call. –  BrokenGlass Feb 26 '12 at 4:37
    
+1 for the LinqPad tip =) –  JwJosefy Jan 30 '13 at 17:51

The return value will simply be ignored, if you do not use it.

You could do something like

if(!dictionary.Remove("plugin-01")) {
    MessageBox.Show("Error: plugin-01 does not exist!");
}

If you do not care, you can safely write

dictionary.Remove("plugin-01");
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The call part is the same, but the assignment part is skipped in the IL. Take a look - here is a disassembly of a simple program:

var d = new Dictionary<int,int>();
bool a = d.Remove(5);
d.Remove(6);

The disassembly looks like this:

    bool a = d.Remove(5);
00000057  mov         ecx,dword ptr [ebp-40h] 
0000005a  mov         edx,5 
0000005f  cmp         dword ptr [ecx],ecx 
00000061  call        69106A00
// Here is the assignment part 
00000066  mov         dword ptr [ebp-4Ch],eax 
00000069  movzx       eax,byte ptr [ebp-4Ch] 
0000006d  mov         dword ptr [ebp-44h],eax 
    d.Remove(6);
00000070  mov         ecx,dword ptr [ebp-40h] 
00000073  mov         edx,6 
00000078  cmp         dword ptr [ecx],ecx 
0000007a  call        69106A00

The top four lines are common; the last three lines from the first call deal with the assignment; they are missing in the disassembly for the second call.

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