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I have some special properties on a backbone.js collection. I came up with a simple example to try and illustrate:

TestCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    properties: {
        something: 'foo',
        other: 'bar'
    }
});

Say that test is a route that is called when the url #test is hit. It runs this method.

test: function(){
    var c = new TestCollection();
    console.log(c.properties.something);
    c.properties.something = 'changed';
},

If I then visit a different hash, say #anythingelse, and then go back to #test, the console still logs "changed", rather than the value of "foo". I need the state to be "reset" when the collection is created. Why is the state staying around when I have a local variable? I've tried some things like _.clone to try and "backup" some properties and have them be retrieved in an initialization function, but I haven't succeeded in that yet. I'm hoping I'm just totally misunderstanding something and that there's a simple solution.

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1 Answer 1

All of your TestCollection instances will end up sharing exactly the same properties value because there's no deep copying going on; in fact, as ggozad notes below, there is no copying going on at all as properties is attached to the prototype rather than the instance. For example, this will give you three pancakes in your console because all three instances share exactly the same {something: '...'} object in their properties:

TestCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    properties: {
        something: 'foo'
    },
    m: function(x) {
        this.properties.something = x;
    }
});
var t1 = new TestCollection();
var t2 = new TestCollection();

t1.m('pancakes');
console.log(t1.properties.something);
console.log(t2.properties.something);

var t3 = new TestCollection();
console.log(t3.properties.something);

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/hBeHU/

An easy way out of this dilemma is to move your properties into the collection's initialize:

TestCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.properties = {
            something: 'foo'
        };
    },
    m: function(x) {
        this.properties.something = x;
    }
});

If you use this version of TestCollection then you'll get one pancakes and two foos in your console.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/GywKF/

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1  
Just to point out that whether all TestCollection instances have a common properties attribute is not related to deep copying. In your first example by defining properties on extend you add it to TestCollection.prototype making a single reference available to all instances of TestCollection, whereas on your second example you create it per TestCollection instance. –  ggozad Feb 26 '12 at 9:13
    
@ggozad: Right, the OP is expecting properties to be deep copied into each instance when it isn't being copied at all. I've tried to clarify that. –  mu is too short Feb 26 '12 at 18:52

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