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My code should pretty much explain my situation. If it doesn't then; I call this method and it returns the "wrong" value. Somehow it either changing the value of one arraylist or it is setting them equal. What I am doing wrong?

public ArrayList<Piece> bestMove (ArrayList<Piece> b, int index) {

    System.out.println ("possible moves = " +this.getPossibleMoves(b, index)); // prints 2

    if (this.getPossibleMoves(b, index) > 0) { // the problem isn't here

        // is the problem here?
        ArrayList<Piece> cloneAlpha = (ArrayList<Piece>) b.clone();
        ArrayList<Piece> cloneBeta = (ArrayList<Piece>) b.clone();

        int x = b.get(index).x; // x = 4
        int y = b.get(index).y; // y = 3

        // x + 1 = 5
        // y + 1 = 4 
        if (!this.checkSquare(x+1, x+1, cloneAlpha)) {

            cloneAlpha.get(index).setXY((x+1), (x+1));

            System.out.println (cloneAlpha.get(index).x + ", " + cloneAlpha.get(index).y); // prints "5, 4"

        }

        // Something goes on between these two conditions
        // it can't be checkSquare method
        // nor the setXY

        // x - 1 = 3
        // y + 1 = 4
        if (!this.checkSquare(x-1, y+1, cloneBeta)) {

            cloneBeta.get(index).setXY(x-1, y+1);

            System.out.println (cloneBeta.get(index).x + ", " + cloneBeta.get(index).y); // prints "3, 4"

        }


        System.out.println (cloneAlpha.get(index).x + ", " + cloneAlpha.get(index).y); // prints "3, 4"
        System.out.println (cloneBeta.get(index).x + ", " + cloneBeta.get(index).y); // prints "3, 4"

        return cloneAlpha;

    }
    return b;
}
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Which line of code doesn't do what you expect? What are your expectations and how does the behavior differ? –  Mark Peters Feb 25 '12 at 20:32

3 Answers 3

clone() only creates shallow copies, which in the case of collections means that the objects contained will not be cloned. If you want deep cloning, you have to implement it yourself.

A much easier and probably better solution is to avoid cloning altogether: instead of creating a copy of the original collection then modifying stuff, you can create a new empty collection, iterate across the original collection and build a new Piece object with the modified values.

Then you can even make Piece immutable, which is often a good idea in itself.

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java.util.ArrayList#clone creates a shallow copy of the list. It does not copy the elements inside, only the references to them. You want to do a deep copy.

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The problem is indeed there:

ArrayList<Piece> cloneAlpha = (ArrayList<Piece>) b.clone();
ArrayList<Piece> cloneBeta = (ArrayList<Piece>) b.clone();

The clone method does not perform a deep clone on the list. So both list shares the same objects. When you do

cloneBeta.get(index).setXY(x-1, y+1);

you overwrite what the

cloneAlpha.get(index).setXY((x+1), (x+1));

did.

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