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I'm going through K & R, and am having difficulty with incrementing pointers. Exercise 5.3 (p. 107) asks you to write a strcat function using pointers.

In pseudocode, the function does the following:

  1. Takes 2 strings as inputs.
  2. Finds the end of string one.
  3. Copies string two onto the end of string one.

I got a working answer:

void strcats(char *s, char *t)
{
    while (*s)            /* finds end of s*/
        s++;
    while ((*s++ = *t++)) /* copies t to end of s*/
        ;
}

But I don't understand why this code doesn't also work:

void strcats(char *s, char *t)
{
    while (*s++)
        ;
    while ((*s++ = *t++))
        ;
}

Clearly, I'm missing something about how pointer incrementation works. I thought the two forms of incrementing s were equivalent. But the second code only prints out string s.

I tried a dummy variable, i, to check whether the function went through both loops. It did. I read over the sections 5.4 and 5.5 of K & R, but I couldn't find anything that sheds light on this.

Can anyone help me figure out why the second version of my function isn't doing what I would like it to? Thanks!

edit: Thanks everyone. It's incredible how long you can stare at a relatively simple error without noticing it. Sometimes there's no better remedy than having someone else glance at it.

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1  
Although K&R is widely regarded as the C bible, it's not a good place to learn how to write good code. Stuff like while (*s++ = *t++); should be consigned to the dustbin of history. –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 25 '12 at 21:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's an off-by-one issue. Your second version increments the pointer every time the test is evaluated. The original increments one fewer time -- the last time when the test evaluates to 0, the increment isn't done. Therefore in the second version, the new string is appended after the original terminating \0, while in the first version, the first character of the new string overwrites that \0.

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oops...of course. I was incrementing my original string past the terminal '\0'. So the second code was concatenating, but nothing was being printed, because printf() stopped at the first '\0'. I tested by putting s-- in the flawed version after the loop, and everything printed fine. Thanks. Funny how you can stare at a problem forever without spotting the flaw. –  Graeme Feb 25 '12 at 20:46

This:

while(*s++)
    ;

due to post-increment, locates the nul byte at the end of the string, then increments it once more before exiting the loop. t is copied after then nul:

scontents␀tcontents␀

Printing s will stop at the first nul.

This:

while(*s)
    s++;

breaks from the loop when the 0 is found, so you are left pointing at the nul byte. t is copied over the nul:

scontentstcontents␀
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This:

while (*s)
    s++;

stops as soon as *s is '\0', at which point it leaves s there (because it doesn't execute the body of the loop).

This:

while (*s++)
    ;

stops as soon as *s is '\0', but still executes the postincrement ++, so s ends up pointing right after the '\0'. So the string-terminating '\0' never gets overwritten, and it still terminates the string.

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There's one less operation in while (*s) ++s; When *s is zero, then the loop breaks, while the form while (*s++) breaks but still increments s one last time.

Strictly speaking, the latter form may be incorrect (i.e. UB) if you attempt to form an invalid pointer. This is contrived, of course, but here's an example: char x = 0, * p = &x; while (*x++) { }.

Independent of that, it's best to write clean, readable and deliberate code rather than trying to outsmart yourself. Sometimes you can write nifty code in C that is actually elegant, and other times it's better to spell something out properly. Use your judgement, and ask someone else for feedback (or watch their faces as they look at your code).

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let's assume the following characters in memory:

Address         0x00 0x01 0x02 0x03
-------         ---- ---- ---- ----
0x8000           'a'  'b'  'c'   0
0x8004           ...

While executing loop, it happens in memory.

1.  *s = 'a'
2.  s = 0x8001
3.  *s = 'b'
4.  s = 0x8002
5.  *s = 'c'
6.  s = 0x8003
7.  *s = 0;
8.  s = 0x8004
9.  end loop

While evaluating, *s++ advances the pointer even if the value of *s is 0.

// move s forward until it points one past a 0 character

while (*s++);

It doesn't work at all because s ends up pointing to a different place.

As it summarizes, we get a garbage value as last character in our target string. That garbage string is because of while loop exceed the limit of '\0' by one step forward.

You can eliminate it by using the below code, I think it is efficient

while (*s)
    s++;

It execute as below in memory perspective.

1.  *s = 'a'
2.  s = 0x8001
3.  *s = 'b'
4.  s = 0x8002
5.  *s = 'c'
6.  s = 0x8003
7.  *s = 0
8.  end loop
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