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I wrote a code to implement spin lock and mutex lock.
There is an interesting but. A magic cout can keep my program alive. If I remove the cout, my program will be sleeping forever. (This only happens in Linux. Windows is doing fine)
Any one have a clue?

#include <pthread.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <queue>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

#define Tcount 10
#define TheLock MutexLock

static inline int TAS(volatile int * ptr) {
    unsigned long result;
    asm volatile("lock;"
                "xchgl %0, %1;"
                : "=r"(result), "=m"(*ptr)
                : "0"(1), "m"(*ptr)
                : "memory");
    return result;
}




class SpinLock {
private:
    int lock;
    pthread_t owner;
public:

    SpinLock() {
        lock = 0;
    }

    void getLock() {
        while (TAS(&lock) == 1) {

        }

        owner = pthread_self();

    }

    void releaseLock() {
        if (lock == 0) {
            cout << "Spin no lock" << endl;
            return;
        } else if (owner == pthread_self()) {
            owner = NULL;
            lock = 0;
        } else {
            throw runtime_error("Spin can't release");
        }
    }


};

class MutexLock {
private:
    int lock;
    pthread_t owner;
    queue<pthread_t> q;
    SpinLock qLock;
public:

    MutexLock() {
        lock = 0;
    }

    void getLock(int id) {
        pthread_t self = pthread_self();
    cout<<"a"<<endl;// magic cout

        if (TAS(&lock) == 0) {
            owner = self;
            return;
        }
        qLock.getLock();
        q.push(self);
        qLock.releaseLock();

        while (owner != self) { 
        }

    }

    void releaseLock(int id) {
        if (lock == 0) {
            cout << "Mutex no lock" << endl;
            return;
        } else if (owner == pthread_self()) {
            qLock.getLock();
            if (q.empty()) {
                owner = NULL;
                lock = 0;
            } else {
        owner = q.front();
                q.pop();        
            }
            qLock.releaseLock();
        } else {
                throw runtime_error("Mutex can't release");
        }
    }
};

TheLock lock;
int g = 0;
void* run(void* pt) {

    int id = (int) pt;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {

        lock.getLock(id);
        //cout<<"Thread "<<id<<" get lock, g="<<g<<endl;
        int next = g + 1;
        g = next;
        //cout<<"Thread "<<id<<" release lock, g="<<g<<endl;
        lock.releaseLock(id);


    }

    return NULL;

}

int main() {

    pthread_t th[Tcount];

    long mtime, seconds, useconds;
    struct timeval start, end;
    gettimeofday(&start, NULL);

    for (int i = 0; i < Tcount; i++) {
        pthread_create(&th[i], NULL, run, (void*) (i+10));
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < Tcount; i++) {
        pthread_join(th[i], 0);
    }
    gettimeofday(&end, NULL);

    seconds = end.tv_sec - start.tv_sec;
    useconds = end.tv_usec - start.tv_usec;

    mtime = ((seconds) * 1000000 + useconds);

    cout << "g=" << g << endl;
    cout << "time=" << mtime << endl;



    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Try reducing it to a minimal code example, about 20 lines of code. –  Peter Wood Feb 25 '12 at 21:12
    
can you produce a minimal example that exhibits the issue? –  bames53 Feb 25 '12 at 21:13
    
You need to start accepting answers. –  Brett Hale Feb 25 '12 at 21:24
    
Brett: what do u mean by accepting answer? –  user956159 Feb 26 '12 at 1:14
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot implement a mutex by using the volatile keyword as the operations may not be atomic. This means that the OS might switch to a different thread before the operation has completed.

For mutex you have to use the OS. It is the only thing that knows when threads are being switched.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry I can't understand what you mean..... –  user956159 Feb 26 '12 at 1:46
2  
Bascially you cannot implement mutex in C++ (or any other language for thaat matter). It is given to you by the operating system. So your code above is useless. The volatile keyword just means that the compiler does not perform optimisations on it because it may change thorough other ways not defined by the program (e.g. a clock). –  Ed Heal Feb 26 '12 at 5:06
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