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It's not about eval()

Let say I have #password input, and I send this data as a part of JSON object

var toSend = {
    text: 'hello',
    pass: $("#password").val()
};

Do I need to validate input? Would ", you: "are hacked" be interpreted on another side of communication as single string or empty string and another property?

edit: Nothing would happen in browser environment, but if JSON would be sent over internet as plain text and parsed again?

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1  
All user submitted data is evil and must be cleansed. –  Michael Robinson Feb 25 '12 at 21:48
    
@MichaelRobinson: Not in this case. Parser does it automatically –  Martin. Feb 25 '12 at 21:51
    
never trust user input, no matter how secure the defaults are. that's one rule when dealing with these things. always be cautious. –  Joseph the Dreamer Feb 25 '12 at 21:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you would do the thing you're describing, nothing would happen, as json is being escaped (if you're using parser (JS object -> JSON))

Nothing would happen in browser environment, but if JSON would be sent over internet as plain text and parsed again?

If you're parsing string version (JSON) to JS object, all values are unesecaped, so you have to escape them afterwards.

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To be precise, stringify escapes it, and parse unescapes it. –  Neil Feb 25 '12 at 22:24
    
@Neil: very well said. Edited my question, thanks. Hmm, how would you call a tool to stringify a JS object? –  Martin. Feb 25 '12 at 22:30
1  
@Martin: JS-O-String-O-Mate? :D –  bvukelic Feb 25 '12 at 23:04

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