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(Oracle PL/SQL)

If I have a simple SQL statement that is throwing an error, ie:

DECLARE
    v_sql_errm varchar2(2048);
BEGIN
    UPDATE my_table SET my_column = do_something(my_column)
        WHERE my_column IS NOT NULL;
EXCEPTION
    when others then
        -- How can I obtain the row/value causing the error (unknown)?
        v_sql_errm := SQLERRM;
        insert into log_error (msg) values ('Error updating value (unknown): '||
             v_sql_errm);
END;

Is there any way within the exception block to determine the row/value on which the query is encountering an error? I would like to be able to log it so that I can then go in and modify/correct the specific data value causing the error.

share|improve this question
1  
Based on the answers below, there does not seem to be a way to determine the actual row/value causing the error. The best solution seems to be iteration using a FOR loop. –  JJ. Jun 3 '09 at 16:41

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A solution using the SAVE EXCEPTIONS clause:

SQL> create table my_table (my_column)
  2  as
  3  select level from dual connect by level <= 9
  4  /

Table created.

SQL> create function do_something
  2  ( p_my_column in my_table.my_column%type
  3  ) return my_table.my_column%type
  4  is
  5  begin
  6    return 10 + p_my_column;
  7  end;
  8  /

Function created.

SQL> alter table my_table add check (my_column not in (12,14))
  2  /

Table altered.

SQL> declare
  2    e_forall_error exception;
  3    pragma exception_init(e_forall_error,-24381)
  4    ;
  5    type t_my_columns is table of my_table.my_column%type;
  6    a_my_columns t_my_columns := t_my_columns()
  7    ;
  8  begin
  9    select my_column
 10           bulk collect into a_my_columns
 11      from my_table
 12    ;
 13    forall i in 1..a_my_columns.count save exceptions
 14      update my_table
 15         set my_column = do_something(a_my_columns(i))
 16       where my_column = a_my_columns(i)
 17    ;
 18  exception
 19  when e_forall_error then
 20    for i in 1..sql%bulk_exceptions.count
 21    loop
 22      dbms_output.put_line(a_my_columns(sql%bulk_exceptions(i).error_index));
 23    end loop;
 24  end;
 25  /
2
4

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

For very large data sets, you probably don't want to blow up your PGA memory, so be sure to use the LIMIT clause in that case.

Regards, Rob.

share|improve this answer

This can be done using DML error logging, if you are on 10gR2 or later.

An example:

SQL> create table my_table (my_column)
  2  as
  3  select level from dual connect by level <= 9
  4  /

Tabel is aangemaakt.

SQL> create function do_something
  2  ( p_my_column in my_table.my_column%type
  3  ) return my_table.my_column%type
  4  is
  5  begin
  6    return 10 + p_my_column;
  7  end;
  8  /

Functie is aangemaakt.

SQL> alter table my_table add check (my_column not in (12,14))
  2  /

Tabel is gewijzigd.

SQL> exec dbms_errlog.create_error_log('my_table')

PL/SQL-procedure is geslaagd.

This creates an error logging table called *err$_my_table*. This table is filled by adding a log errors clause to your update statement:

SQL> begin
  2    update my_table
  3       set my_column = do_something(my_column)
  4     where my_column is not null
  5           log errors reject limit unlimited
  6    ;
  7  end;
  8  /

PL/SQL-procedure is geslaagd.

SQL> select * from err$_my_table
  2  /

                       ORA_ERR_NUMBER$
--------------------------------------
ORA_ERR_MESG$
--------------------------------------------------------------------
ORA_ERR_ROWID$
--------------------------------------------------------------------
OR
--
ORA_ERR_TAG$
--------------------------------------------------------------------
MY_COLUMN
--------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  2290
ORA-02290: check constraint (RWK.SYS_C00110133) violated
AAGY/aAAQAABevcAAB
U

12

                                  2290
ORA-02290: check constraint (RWK.SYS_C00110133) violated
AAGY/aAAQAABevcAAD
U

14


2 rijen zijn geselecteerd.

Prior to 10gR2, you can use the SAVE EXCEPTIONS clause: http://rwijk.blogspot.com/2007/11/save-exceptions.html

Regards, Rob.

share|improve this answer
    
I read through this, as well as your blog link and unless I am misunderstanding this still only gives me the error messages (ie. SQLCODE and SQLERRM) and not the data value triggering the error. That unfortunately isn't helpful. BTW I'm stuck with using 9g. –  JJ. Jun 3 '09 at 16:25
    
If you look closely at the contents of err$_my_table, you'll notice my_column saying 12 and 14, which are the new values that failed to update. I will post another answer, specifically for your 9i version. Also because it hurts my eyes to see you chose a row-by-row approach :-) –  Rob van Wijk Jun 3 '09 at 18:59

try outputting your error and see if it gives you the information you are looking for. For example:

EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS
    THEN
      DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(SQLERRM);
END;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but that just gives me a description of the error such as "invalid month" for date operations or "value too large" if the value exceeds the column size. I need to know which value caused that error so that I can make appropriate corrections to the data. –  JJ. Jun 3 '09 at 14:34

For more detailing information regarding how execution arrived at the line in question, you could try displaying the output returned by these functions:

  • DBMS_UTILITY.format_error_stack:

    Format the current error stack. This can be used in exception handlers to look at the full error stack.

  • DBMS_UTILITY.format_error_backtrace:

    Format the backtrace from the point of the current error to the exception handler where the error has been caught. NULL string is returned if no error is currently being handled.

share|improve this answer

Try this (not tested):

    DECLARE
      cursor c1 is
        select key_column, my_column
        from my_table
        WHERE my_column IS NOT NULL
        ORDER BY key_column;

      my_table_rec my_table%ROWTYPE;

    BEGIN

      FOR my_table_rec in c1
      LOOP
        UPDATE my_table SET my_column = do_something(my_column)
            WHERE key_column = my_table_rec.key_column;
      END LOOP;

    EXCEPTION
        when others then
        insert into log_error (msg) values ('Error updating key_column: ' || my_table_rec.key_column || ', my_column: ' || my_table_rec.my_column);
    END;
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for suggesting to move from a single update statement to row-by-row (also known as slow-by-slow) processing. –  Rob van Wijk Jun 3 '09 at 14:49
    
OK Rob! You must have in mind that "you can't eat your cake and have it too". My solution works. What about yours? –  Christian Jun 3 '09 at 14:59
    
Yep I had thought of iterating through them individually and getting it that way... it is a HUGE dataset though and was hoping to get the answer directly without having to iterate (and learn something new at the same time!). It is a good suggestion though, thanks! –  JJ. Jun 3 '09 at 15:37
    
@Christian: as you can see on this page, my solution works as well :-) –  Rob van Wijk Jun 3 '09 at 16:07
    
Note for anyone else trying to use this, you'll need to add 'FOR UPDATE' to the select on the cursor. This isn't the solution I was hoping for, but it seems to be the only means of actually getting the value based on the answers given here. –  JJ. Jun 3 '09 at 16:42

PL/SQL defines 2 global variables to refer to errors:

SQLERRM : SQL error Message

SQLERRNO: SQL error Number

This is readable in the EXCEPTION block in your PL/SQL.

DECLARE 
    x number;
BEGIN
    SELECT 5/0 INTO x FROM DUAL;
EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS THEN:
        dbms_output.put_line('Error Message: '||SQLERRM);
        dbms_output.put_line('Error Number: '||SQLERRNO);
END;
share|improve this answer
    
That gives me the error, not the value triggering the error. –  JJ. Jun 3 '09 at 15:33

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