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I want to make a GET request to retrieve the contents of a web-page or a web service. I want to send specific headers for this request AND I want to set the IP address FROM WHICH this request will be sent. (The server on which this code is running has multiple IP addresses available).

How can I achieve this with Python and its libraries?

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Are you asking for a specific example of how to use urllib (since you tagged it) or looking for any python library for making http requests? –  jdi Feb 25 '12 at 23:57
    
"as in, selecting the interface that the machine has {one out of many ip addresses}" - no idea what you're asking here. –  Joe Feb 25 '12 at 23:57
    
@Joe - Right. Is he talking about the endpoint to which he is making the request, or is he talking about modifying the headers on the originating machine? Confused. –  jdi Feb 26 '12 at 0:02
    
I want to make a GET request to retrieve the contents of a web-page or a web service. I want to send specific headers for this request and I want to set the IP address FROM WHICH this request will be sent. (The server on which this code is running has multiple IP addresses available). –  Phil Feb 26 '12 at 0:05
    
@Phil: Please update the question to contain all the details. Don't ask people to read the comments as well as the question. Make the question complete. Also. Please read about urllib2 and focus your question on the parts of urllib2 you have specific questions about. –  S.Lott Feb 26 '12 at 0:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I checked urllib2 and it won't set the source address (at least not on Python 2.7). The underlying library is httplib, which does have that feature, so you may have some luck using that directly.

From the httplib documentation:

class httplib.HTTPConnection(host[, port[, strict[, timeout[, source_address]]]])

The optional source_address parameter may be a tuple of a (host, port) to use as the source address the HTTP connection is made from.

You may even be able to convince urllib2 to use this feature by creating a custom HTTPHandler class. You will need to duplicate some code from urllib2.py, because AbstractHTTPHandler is using a simpler version of this call:

class AbstractHTTPHandler(BaseHandler):
    # ...
    def do_open(self, http_class, req):
        # ...
        h = http_class(host, timeout=req.timeout) # will parse host:port

Where http_class is httplib.HTTPConnection for HTTP connections.

Probably this would work instead, if patching urllib2.py (or duplicating and renaming it) is an acceptable workaround:

        h = http_class(host, timeout=req.timeout, source_address=(req.origin_req_host,0))
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There are many options available to you for making http requests. I don't even think there is really a commonly agreed upon "best". You could use any of these:

  1. urllib2: http://docs.python.org/library/urllib2.html
  2. requests: http://docs.python-requests.org/en/v0.10.4/index.html
  3. mechanize: http://wwwsearch.sourceforge.net/mechanize/

This list is not exhaustive. Read the docs and take your pick. Some are lower level and some offer rich browser-like features. All of them let you set headers before making request.

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Thank you. How do I set the IP Address though with ANY of these libraries? Thank you! –  Phil Feb 26 '12 at 0:14
    
You can only set request headers. I dont think its possible to selct which interface it will go out on. –  jdi Feb 26 '12 at 1:19
    
Thank you. That's a pity though. –  Phil Feb 26 '12 at 2:17

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