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4  
Can you explain your reasoning on how you expected to get 12? –  Mysticial Feb 26 '12 at 0:45
    
my bad..did a mistake in calculation. I get it now. –  Ava Feb 26 '12 at 0:48
2  
@Mysticial something like this: 1 & 100 = 1100 –  mvds Feb 26 '12 at 0:48
    
The & operator doesn't glue byte strings together. See the answers below. –  Chris Feb 26 '12 at 0:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Well.. because.

For &, the AND operator:

0001       = 1
0100       = 4
---- (AND)
0000       = 0

for |, the OR operator:

0001       = 1
0100       = 4
---- (OR)
0101       = 5
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Bitwise & => If both bits are higher, then the output is higher else output is zero.

0 0 1
1 0 0
-----
0 0 0  => 0   // 1 & 1 = 1 , 1 & 0 = 0

Now try yourself Bitwise |. Any of the bit is higher, output is higher.

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1 is 0b001, and 4 is 0b100, so, naturally, 1&4 is 0b000 and 1|4 is 0b101, which is 5.

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Look at it in binary form.

1d(ecimal) = 001b(inary)

4d(ecimal) = 100b(inary)

thus

001b
100b & (both bits have to be 1 to yield 1)
--
000b = 0d

and

001b
100b | (only one on either side (or both) has to be 1 to yield 1)
--
101b = 5d
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