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I have two classes, Base and Derived, around which I want to write wrappers. Derived contains additional functionality not present in Base. These classes are outside my control and I can't modify them.

The question is this: how can I wrap both classes without either a) having to cast or b) significant code duplication?

Here's a solution with casting:

class BaseWrapper {
    Base b;
    someFunction() {
        b.someFunction();
    }
}

class DerivedWrapper : BaseWrapper {
    someOtherFunction() {
        ((Derived) b).someOtherFunction();
    }
}

Here's one with duplication:

class BaseWrapper {
    Base b;
    someFunction() {
        b.someFunction();
    }
}

class DerivedWrapper {
    Derived d;
    someFunction() {
        d.someFunction();
    }
    someOtherFunction() {
        d.someOtherFunction();
    }
}

I prefer the first solution to the second, but surely there must be something better...

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

(Note: Assuming this code is C#, or C#-like pseudocode)

Pretty much the only thing I can think of is to subclass BaseWrapper, hold an additional reference to your object as its actual type (Derived), and set b to be (Base) d. Assuming you're passing in the wrapped object in the constructor, I'd set it up like this:

class BaseWrapper {
    Base b;
    someFunction() {
        b.someFunction();
    }
}

class DerivedWrapper : BaseWrapper {
    Derived d;

    DerivedWrapper(Derived d) {
        this.d = d;
        this.b = (Base) d;
    }

    someOtherFunction() {
        d.someOtherFunction();
    }
}

someFunction continues to work from the superclass, since you still have a Base b. You still have one cast, but it's in the constructor and you don't have to specify in every method.

(Note: You don't even need the cast in the constructor, but it's a nice reminder that your other reference isn't the same type.)

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I like your answer and I'm somewhat annoyed I didn't think of it immediately. :) I doubt there's a better way. You don't even need the cast in the constructor. –  iansimon Feb 26 '12 at 2:56
    
That's true. Still, I would favor explicit casts over implicit casts. I'll make note of it in my answer. –  chroipahtz Feb 26 '12 at 2:58

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