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I can seem to see why this doesn't work:

#!/bin/bash

if [ $# -ne 1 ] || [ $# -ne 2 ]; then 
# Should run if there are either 1 or 2 options specified
  echo "usage: ${0##*/} <username>"
  exit
fi

When testing to see if it works:

root@ubuntu:~# testing.sh optionone optiontwo
...Correct output...
root@ubuntu:~# testing.sh optionone
usage: testing.sh <username>
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note that you are executing 2 commands in:

[ $# -ne 1 ] || [ $# -ne 2 ]

[ $# -ne 1 ] is a 1st command, and the [ $# -ne 2 ] command is executed only if the previous has a non-zero error code as of the || shell operator.

In your case, it is not important, but in the case bellow, it is:

[ $? -eq 0 ] || [ $? -eq 1 ]

The 2nd command will always be true, as the 2nd $? is the return code of [ $? -eq 0 ]. You can test it with the lines bellow that will print true twice:

function f() { return $1; }
f 1
{ [ $? -eq 0 ] || [ $? -eq 1 ]; } && echo "true"
f 2
{ [ $? -eq 0 ] || [ $? -eq 1 ]; } && echo "true"

The correct way to execute a or in a single command is:

[ $? -eq 0 -o $? -eq 1 ]

This way, those bellow only print true once:

function f() { return $1; }
f 1
{ [ $? -eq 0 -o $? -eq 1 ]; } && echo "true"
f 2
{ [ $? -eq 0 -o $? -eq 1 ]; } && echo "true"

And concerning your original question, kev has already point out that there was a logic error in your test. The negative of [ $# -eq 1 ] || [ $# -eq 2 ] is NOT [ $# -eq 1 ] && NOT [ $# -eq 2 ] and this becomes [ $# -ne 1 ] && [ $# -ne 2 ] or in a single command:

[ $# -ne 1 -a $# -ne 2 ]
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Change the boolean logic:

if [ $# -ne 1 ] && [ $# -ne 2 ]; then

Or

if ! ( [ $# -eq 1 ] || [ $# -eq 2 ] ); then

BTW, you can use Shell-Arithmetic ((...)):

if (( $#!=1 && $#!=2 )); then
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if 2 is true then 1 returns false, and vice versa, so it has to be or –  King Feb 26 '12 at 4:48
    
Note that using parentheses, you are starting a subshell. This function f() { a=hello; ! ( a=world && { [ $# -eq 1 ] || [ $# -eq 2 ]; } ) && echo $a; }; f a b c will print hello and this function f() { a=hello; ! { a=world && { [ $# -eq 1 ] || [ $# -eq 2 ]; } } && echo $a; }; f a b c will print world. –  jfgagne Feb 26 '12 at 9:31
    
@King Please just try/test the && thing. –  A.H. Feb 26 '12 at 9:38
    
I've tested them all but none of them work, they only allow me to have 0 options selected, I've had to result to just using if [ $1 ] then #true is good# else echo "usage: ${0##*/} <username>" I'm probably doing something wrong since everyone else expects these to work? exit fi –  King Feb 26 '12 at 12:34

One way to make this work is to switch out the -ne comparison operator for -lt and -gt (less than and greater than) for the conditional statement. Like this:

#!/bin/bash

#Should run if there are either 1 or 2 options specified
if [ $# -lt 1 ] || [ $# -gt 2 ]; then
    echo "usage: ${0##*/} <username>"
    exit
fi
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It dosen't work at all with that code.. root@ubuntu:~# testing.sh hello goodbye usage: testing.sh <username> root@ubuntu:~# testing.sh hello usage: testing.sh <username> –  King Feb 26 '12 at 2:16
    
I fixed the answer; it should work for you now? –  summea Feb 26 '12 at 3:02
    
I've resulted to just using if [ ${1} ] then echo "" else ... exit ... –  King Feb 26 '12 at 4:46
    
Either way... as long as you are getting the result you need, here; –  summea Feb 26 '12 at 5:26

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