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I have a problem and tried already allot of ways to solve it.

the problem is quite simple how can I use both the Item ID and the amount as a primary key?

Since this will make the item a tiny blob. And if I use @MapsId it gives the exact same thing.

@Entity
public class C_Drop extends LightEntity implements Serializable {

    @Id
    @ManyToOne
    private C_Item item;
    @Id
    private double amount;
}

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.TABLE_PER_CLASS)
public class C_Drops extends LightEntity implements Serializable {

    @Id
    double id;

    @OneToMany
    private List<C_Drop> drops;
}
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This does not make much sense to me. A many to one relationship implies many of your derived records map to one C_Item, which means on the derived end that C_Item is not going to be unique. Which kinda makes it useless to be an id. – Perception Feb 26 '12 at 6:54
    
its because 1 item can have multiple items listed as drop. Then another item can also have it listed as drop. And then another item has listed it as drop but drops an other amount. like: potion box A drops 1 red potion, potion box B drops 2 red potion, and potion box C drops again 1 red potion. – Niceone Feb 26 '12 at 12:35

I haven't done this myself, but you could probably use a combination of a Composite Primary Key and double-mapping the column. e.g.:

@Entity
@IdClass(C_DropPK.class)
public class C_Drop extends LightEntity {
    @Id
    private double amount;

    @Id
    @Column(name = "ITEM_ID")
    private double itemId;

    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="ITEM_ID")
    private C_Item item;
}

Then:

public class C_DropPK {
    private double itemId;

    private double amount;
}
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