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I have a form where I have lots of textboxes and all of them are required to be filled out. In C# how do I actually if check there are group of fields having a null or whitespace?

I am familiar with string.isNullOrWhiteSpace(string here) but I don't want to do multiple if statements of that, it would result in a bad code.

I am trying to avoid something like this

if(string.isNullOrWhiteSpace(string here)
   || string.isNullOrWhiteSpace(string here)
   || string.isNullOrWhiteSpace(string here))
{
   // do something
}

Are there fix for this type of bad code?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can query the controls collection of the form (or relevant container) and filter for textboxes and further query to see if any are empty (none should really have null values). Example:

var emptyTextboxes = from tb in this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>()
                     where string.IsNullOrEmpty(tb.Text)
                     select tb;

if (emptyTextboxes.Any())
{
    // one or more textboxes are empty
}

You can do effectively the same thing using the fluent syntax.

bool isIncomplete = this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>().Any(tb => string.IsNullOrEmpty(tb.Text));
if (isIncomplete)
{
    // do your work
}

For this code, you should be working with at least Visual Studio 2008 / C# 3 / .NET 3.5. Your project needs to have a reference to System.Core.dll (should have one by default) and you need a using System.Linq; directive in the class file.


Based upon your comments, consider another method if you are having trouble understanding or working with the linq version. You can certainly do this in an explicit loop (the Linq code will ultimately be a loop as well). Consider

bool isIncomplete = false; 
foreach (Control control in this.Controls)
{
     if (control is TextBox)
     {
          TextBox tb = control as TextBox;
          if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(tb.Text))
          {
               isIncomplete = true;
               break;
          }
     }
}

if (isIncomplete)
{

}

Finally, this code is written as if all of the textboxes are in a single container. That container might be the form, a panel, etc. You will need to point to the appropriate container (eg., instead of this (the form) it might be this.SomePanel). If you are working with controls that are in multiple and perhaps nested containers, you will need to do more work to find them programmatically (recursive searching, explicit concatenation, etc.) or you might just preload the references into an array or other collection. For example

var textboxes = new [] { textbox1, textbox2, textbox3, /* etc */ };
// write query against textboxes instead of this.Controls

You said you have multiple GroupBox controls. If each GroupBox is loaded onto the form and not nested in another control, this may get you started.

var emptyTextboxes = from groupBox in this.Controls.OfType<GroupBox>()
                     from tb in groupBox.Controls.OfType<TextBox>()
                     where string.IsNullOrEmpty(tb.Text)
                     select tb;
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can you further explain your code? –  user962206 Feb 26 '12 at 4:10
    
What part are you having trouble understanding? This is using Linq, which has been part of the last 2 releases of C# and Visual Studio (2008 and 2010). –  Anthony Pegram Feb 26 '12 at 4:11
1  
@user962206 you can query any collection of objects. That said both 101 Linq Samples for Visual C# and Getting Started with LINQ in C# should be more than enough to get you started. –  ahsteele Feb 26 '12 at 4:18
1  
That work might be writing a method to recursively search through containers, it might be concatenating the controls collection from multiple containers together, or it just might be creating your own collection to hold references to the controls. At any rate, this code certainly works in a small program, but you are the only one who knows how your form is laid out. –  Anthony Pegram Feb 26 '12 at 4:46
1  
@user962206, well, in the context of the code, what would you guess it would do? In the first snippet, it simply tells you if there are any items in the sequence. It will return true or false. It does not need to walk the entire sequence, making it (normally) cheaper than using Count(). In the second example, there is a predicate involved. But it is still the same outcome, it simply tells you if any elements pass the predicate. –  Anthony Pegram Feb 26 '12 at 5:15

That depends on what you consider "bad code." Depending on your requirements what text boxes are required to be filled out can vary. Further, even if all of the fields are required all of the time you still want to give friendly error messages letting people know which field they didn't fill out. There a variety of approaches to solving this issue depending on how you are rendering your form. Since you haven't specified any here's a very direct method for doing so.

var incompleteTextBoxes = this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>()
                              .Where(tb => string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(tb.Text));

foreach (var textBox in inCompleteTextBoxes)
{
    // give user feedback about which text boxes they have yet to fill out
}
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Yet another solution. This will recursively travel the whole control Tree , and Check for null or empty text in all of the textboxes. caveat - If you have some fancy controls not inheriting from the standard Winforms textbox - check will not be performed

 bool check(Control root,List<Control> nonFilled)
 {
    bool result =true;
   if (root is TextBox &&  string.isNullOrEmpty(((TextBox)root).Text)   )
    {
    nonFilled.Add(root);
    return false;
   }
   foreach(Control c in root.Controls)
   {
    result|=check(c,nonFilled)
   }
   return result;
 }

Usage :

  List<Control> emptytextboxes=new List<Control>()
  bool isOK=check(form, emptytextboxes);
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