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consider this code snippet

   void make(int n)
   {
     std::string user_input;
     std::istringstream iss(user_input);
     char letter;
     int index;
     while(n>0)
    { cout<<n<<endl;
      std::getline(std::cin, user_input);
      while (iss >> letter >> index)
      cout<<letter<<' '<<index;
      n--;
    }
   }  
   int main()
   { int n;
     cin>>n;
     make(n);
     return 0; 
   }

here loop is not running correctly
if i put n=5 then output is

5
//getline doesn't work
4
then getline works... why this

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean "getline doesn't work"? –  Gordon Bailey Feb 26 '12 at 4:40
    
@ Gordon Bailey: i mean that for n=5 nothing happens . only one statement is executing in loop body i.e. n-- .When n becomes 4 ,everthing is ok.. –  T.J. Feb 26 '12 at 4:52
    
What is this bizarre indentation scheme? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 26 '12 at 4:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason why it's doing this, is because when you're calling getline(), it's taking what's in cin and putting it in the variable. However, when you initially called cin to take in the inital input, the newline character remained in the buffer after going into your make() function.

So when you enter the loop, the first getline() takes '\n' from cin, and the buffer was cleared. That's why it seems to "skip" the first iteration as it would seem.

So in order to get it to function correctly, you should clear your input buffer when you call your function using cin.ignore(), like so:

 void make(int n)
 {
 cin.ignore(1000,'\n'); //ignores 1000 characters or until sees \n
 std::string user_input;
 std::istringstream iss(user_input);
 char letter;
 int index;
 while(n>0)
{ cout<<n<<endl;
  std::getline(std::cin, user_input);
  while (iss >> letter >> index)
  cout<<letter<<' '<<index;
  n--;
}
}  
int main()
{ int n;
  cin>>n;
  make(n);
  return 0; 
 }

I haven't used c++ much recently, so at the moment, i'm not sure if there's a better way to handle this, but this should give you a good direction.

share|improve this answer
    
Almost; it's the \n from the n input that's still in the buffer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 26 '12 at 4:55
    
Oh, so value put in is gone, but only the \n stayed behind? Edit: I edited it, thanks. –  MysticXG Feb 26 '12 at 4:58
    
Yes. The numeric value was already extracted, and used... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 26 '12 at 5:01
    
@Lightness Races in Orbit Yeah, i realized after i thought about it when you mentioned it haha, I just assumed the whole thing stayed behind since I knew something was there. –  MysticXG Feb 26 '12 at 5:03

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