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let me explain my confusion with sample code

this is our macro

#define rsAssert(v)   if(!(v)) printf("rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i" #v, __FILE__, __LINE__); 

case 1:

int main(void)
{
  rsAssert(0);
  return 0;
}

this case compiles succesfully

case 2

int main(void)
{
  rsAssert(0)  // note here ;  is not present
  return 0;
}

this also compiles succsfully Question 1:

it means whether you write rsAssert(0) or rsAssert(0); no difference between them?


then

case 3

int main()
{
  if(1)
    rsAssert(0);
  else 
    printf("mr.32");
  return 0;
}

here rsassert(0); is not going to compile [see http://ideone.com/7dFv1] but without ; rsasser(0) works fine [see http://ideone.com/8fehl]..

I am not getting what's going on with macro expansion here...

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The reason it is not working in case 3 is because this is what is actually getting compiled:

int main()
{
if(1)
  if(!(v)) printf("rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i", #v, __FILE__, __LINE__);;
else 
  printf("mr.32");
return 0;
}

Note the extra semicolon at the end of the first printf from the macro.

Normally, with an if statement, it's followed by a single statement, or a block with { }.

But because of the extra ;, you have this:

if (...) 
    printf(...); ;
else
    printf(...);
return 0;

That extra semicolon is an empty statement, but is still a statement nonetheless.

You should remove the ; from the macro. Then things would make more sense.

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oh thanks got it whole things.. in case 1 it has one more ; wich is empty statement and in case 2 is perfect but in case 2 using rsassert(0); case extra ; which create problem... –  Mr.32 Feb 26 '12 at 6:17
1  
Yes. Simply, when looking at macro replacement in C, it's pretty much literally just copied in to the file. They don't really have any semantics of their own. –  Will Hartung Feb 26 '12 at 15:50

This is the biggest reason I always enforce my programmers to use bodies on all of their if statements.

int main()
{
  if (1)
    if(!(0))
      printf("rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i", "0", __FILE__, __LINE__);
    else 
      printf("mr.32");
  return 0;
}

prevented by good coding standards

int main()
{
  if (1){
    if(!(0)){
      printf("rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i", "0", __FILE__, __LINE__);
      }
    }
    else {
      printf("mr.32");
    }
  return 0;
}

Fixes that are low cost of change listed blow.

#define rsAssert(v) (printf( (!v)?"rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i":"", #v, __FILE__, __LINE__))

This will work but will always do a printf.

#define rsAssert(v) ((!v)?printf("rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i", #v, __FILE__, __LINE__):0)

This will only print out if you trip the assert, but is messy looking

Also consider the following!

if( rand()%2 )
  FooLog("Hello World");
ImportantFunction();

#if DEBUG
#define FooLog printf
#else
#define FooLog //
#endif

In release, the important function works 100% of the time 50% of the time.

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ha ha ha good catch...!!! –  Mr.32 Feb 26 '12 at 6:23
    
Added another case for you. –  Nico Feb 26 '12 at 6:33

It's not working at all in case 3, I expect. Do the expansion by hand (and reindent for it to make sense):

int main()
{
  if (1)
    if(!(0))
      printf("rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i", "0", __FILE__, __LINE__);
    else 
      printf("mr.32");
  return 0;
}

As you can see, the else ends up with the wrong if statement. If you want a macro containing an if statement to work, you need to make it look like a simple statement. Wrapping it in do... while(0) is idiomatic:

#define rsAssert(v)                                                         \
    do {                                                                    \
      if(!(v))                                                              \
        printf("rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i", #v, __FILE__, __LINE__); \
    } while (0) 
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1  
+1 for advocating do-while (0). –  jamesdlin Feb 26 '12 at 10:41
if(1)
  rsAssert(0); // Original semicolon
else 
  ....

expands to

if(1)
   if(!(v)) printf("rsAssert failed: %s, in %s at %i",
       #v, __FILE__, __LINE__);; // Notice the extra semicolon. The extra from the
                                 // macro expansion.
else
    ....

This extra semicolon is causing an new empty statement. Since there is no {}, for if statement, else is not immediately followed and is what compiler is complaining. So, do -

if(1)
{
  rsAssert(0);
}
 else 
  ....
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