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Why is it an error to use an empty set of brackets to call a constructor with no arguments?

$ cat cons.cpp
#include <iostream>

class Matrix {
private:
    int m_count;

public:
    Matrix() {
        m_count = 1;
        std::cout << "yahoo!" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main() {
    std::cout << "before" << std::endl;
    Matrix m1();                         // <----
    std::cout << "after" << std::endl;
}
$ g++ cons.cpp
$ ./a.out
before
after
$

What does the syntax Matrix m1(); do?

I believed that it is the same as Matrix m1;. Obviously I am wrong.

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marked as duplicate by Charles Bailey, Troubadour, Cody Gray, FredOverflow, Luc Danton Feb 26 '12 at 10:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted
Matrix m1(); // m1 is a function whose return type is Matrix.

Also this C++ FAQ lite entry should be helpful.

Is there any difference between List x; and List x();

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1  
@Lazer: to convince yourself, try to use m1 (for example accessing m1.m_count )... –  Francesco Feb 26 '12 at 7:50
    
In C++11 you can use braces for all constructor calls this avoids c++'s most vexing parse i.e Matrix m1{}; –  mark Feb 26 '12 at 8:58
    
This isn't the "most vexing parse", the most vexing parse is when you try to declare and object and pass a value initialized temporary to one or more of it's constructor parameters. E.g. A b(A());. Matrix m1(); is just a regular function declaration. –  Charles Bailey Feb 26 '12 at 9:14
    
@CharlesBailey: the Most Vexing Parse is about treating a declaration as a function declaration if at all possible. This question is indeed just yet another Most Vexing Parse question. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 26 '12 at 10:58
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Matrix m1() declares a function that takes no parameters and returns a Matrix. You can see this is so by adding a method to Matrix and trying to invoke it on m1:

#include <iostream>

class Matrix {
private:
    int m_count;

public:
    Matrix() {
        m_count = 1;
        std::cout << "yahoo!" << std::endl;
    }
    void foo() {}
};

int main() {
    std::cout << "before" << std::endl;
    Matrix m1();
    m1.foo();
    std::cout << "after" << std::endl;
}

gives error: request for member 'foo' in 'm1', which is of non-class type 'Matrix()'

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Think from C language perspective:

int data_member();

is actually a prototype for function taking void and returning int. When you change it like:

T data();

it still is a function declaration, retuning T. When you need to declare it as variable, you do:

T data; // int data;
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This will do what you're trying to do:

int main() {
    std::cout << "before" << std::endl;
    Matrix m1;                         // <----
    std::cout << "after" << std::endl;
}

In C++, if you initialize a variable with parens, it actually declares a function that takes no parameters and returns that type.

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