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I ask because I couldn't find the stack trace in Visual Studio, while debugging an exception that occurred.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 131 down vote accepted

While debugging, Debug/Windows/Call Stack

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12  
==> "while debugging" <== –  prabhakaran Mar 20 '12 at 14:54

enter image description here

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+1 for the picture =D (I like when someone put an enforce to make a screenshot) –  Michel Ayres Jul 23 '12 at 17:01

The default shortcut key is Ctrl-Alt-C.

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It's important to note that you must be in 'debug' mode to see the call stack window. –  dss539 Jun 3 '09 at 16:58
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@dss539 I think you have a debugger attached, it can either debug or release build. It's also important that you have enough symbols loaded for your debugging session, otherwise you will get misleading/garbage callstacks. –  Chris O Oct 10 '13 at 17:30
    
@ChrisO -- Yes, I meant that Visual Studio should be in the 'debugging' state. Sorry, I can see how my original wording leaves room for misinterpretation. –  dss539 Dec 12 '13 at 16:17

Do you mean finding a stack trace of the thrown exception location? That's either Debug/Exceptions, or better - Ctrl-Alt-E. Set filters for the exceptions you want to break on.

There's even a way to reconstruct the thrower stack after the exception was caught, but it's really unpleasant. Much, much easier to set a break on the throw.

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Using the Call Stack Window

To open the Call Stack window in Visual Studio, from the Debug menu, choose Windows>Call Stack. To set the local context to a particular row in the stack trace display, double click the first column of the row.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/hh439516(v=vs.85).aspx

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