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I'd like to make a tree which can have some childrens in every node, but i don't know number of them. Tree have to be coded in small memory using (no extra data) with constant time to every node. I tought that i will make class Tree with value and children property (value is int, and children is stack) and array of pointers to every node in that Tree. My problem is to make this array. How can i make it with no extra data (std::vector sometimes allocate more memory than it needs) and constant time to every cell?

Everything's ok, but i also need constant time to every node. I know how many nodes will be, but i dont know how to make array of every node. It should work something like: array[n];
A_Node *array[0]= new A_Node(16);
A_Node *n = new A_Node(1);
array[0]->addChild(n);
array[1]=n;
Or: *(array+1)=n;

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What operations do you need to be able to perform on that tree? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 26 '12 at 10:28
    
Add node, add children to node, and after adding every node i will make array to flat this tree (but not straight). –  Piotr Łużecki Feb 26 '12 at 10:31
    
What do you mean by "children is stack" ? –  Lefteris Feb 26 '12 at 10:31
    
std::vector allocates more memory because it wants to save you several indeterministically expensive calls to malloc (when you grow your vector one item at a time). You can use .reserve(size) if you know your vector shall have a fixed size, and your tree will never have more nodes than you define there. –  Frg Feb 26 '12 at 10:37
    
@Frg: Don't you want to use the constructor where you pass in the capacity instead? Also, reserve makes sure the vector has at least the specified capacity. Then again, I'm not sure if the constructor version is allowed to overallocate. –  Thomas Eding Feb 26 '12 at 11:03

2 Answers 2

This is a possible example. It is not a full example solution but I hope you get the point. The point is that you can have a double pointer to nodes, which is basically an array of pointers to nodes of the tree.

Then you can reallocate the size yourself and to however much you want whenever there is a need to. But std::vector already does that for you so there is no real reason not to use it unless you want to control everything yourself or experiment, or are writing something in C. In any case hope this helps.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

// The initial buffer length of a node's children
#define BUFFER_LENGTH   5
// How much to multiply with if an addition of a child goes over the buffer
#define MULTIPLIER 2

///Your node class
class A_Node
{
    public:
    A_Node(int value,unsigned int childrenN=0)
    {
        this->value = value;
        this->childrenN = childrenN;

        //allocate BUFFER_LENGTH children for the node at first or childrenN if the childrenN is not initially 0
        if(childrenN != 0)
        {
            this->children = (A_Node**) malloc(sizeof(A_Node*)*childrenN);
            this->bufferLength = childrenN;
        }
        else
        {
            this->children = (A_Node**) malloc(sizeof(A_Node*)*BUFFER_LENGTH);
                        this->bufferLength =BUFFER_LENGTH;
        }
    }

    //in the destructor of a node it would need some special care
    ~A_Node()
    {
        //for every child call the destructor of each child
        for(int i = 0; i < this->childrenN; i++)
        {
            delete this->children[i];
        }

        //and only then free the buffer of the pointers to the children
        free(this->children);
    }

    //adds a child
    void addChild(A_Node* child)
    {
        //reallocate if needed
        if(childrenN >= this->bufferLength)
        {
            realloc(this->children,sizeof(A_Node*)*MULTIPLIER);
        }

        this->children[childrenN] = child;
        this->childrenN++;
    }

    A_Node* getChild(unsigned int i)
    {
        if(i >= this->childrenN)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        return this->children[i];
    }

    void printValue()
    {
        printf("%d\n",this->value);
    }
private:
    int value;
    unsigned int childrenN;
    A_Node** children;
    unsigned int bufferLength;
};

///Your tree class
class A_Tree
{
    public:
        //constructor
        A_Tree(int rootValue)
        {
            root = new A_Node(rootValue);
        }
        //destructor
        ~A_Tree()
        {
            //recursively kills all the nodes due to the destructor of node
            delete root;
        }
        //your root node
        A_Node* root;
};


int main()
{
    A_Tree tree(16);

    tree.root->addChild(new A_Node(42));

    tree.root->printValue();

    (tree.root->getChild(0))->printValue();


    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah I forgot the dtor in mine. Silly me. +1 :) –  arasmussen Feb 26 '12 at 11:11
    
Everything's ok, but i also need constant time to every node. I know how many nodes will be, but i dont know how to make array of every node. It should work something like: <code> array[n];<br> A_Node *array[0]= new A_Node(16);<br> A_Node *n = new A_Node(1);<br> array[0]->addChild(n);<br> array[1]=n;<br> </code> Or: <code> *(array+1)=n;</code> –  Piotr Łużecki Feb 26 '12 at 11:21
    
@PiotrŁużecki I saw the edit in your question and I don't really understand what you mean. You do realize that A_Node *array[0]= new A_Node(16); does not compile right? If you just mean that you know beforehand how many children each node has then my solution covers that too. All you gotta do is give the childrenN parameter to the A_Node ctor –  Lefteris Feb 26 '12 at 11:53
    
I know it doesn't compile : / Do you know solution familiar to this? I know how many nodes in tree will be but now how many children each node will have, so your solution is great. But when i will read data from input i will have to put new Node in random Node so i need constant time to each node (this tree can be huge). –  Piotr Łużecki Feb 26 '12 at 12:04
    
@PiotrŁużecki I still don't understand what you mean. Can you provide a sample of input data and what you want to do with them? Also provide some form of pseudo-code solution that you want to do. That way people will be able to help you and will be more inclined to since you would have shown some effort in writing a question that makes more sense. But because this sounds like a different question I believe you would have to ask it as a different question. ATTENTION: Add example of input data , pseudo-code of your logic and your problem. –  Lefteris Feb 26 '12 at 12:15

Just keep track of the memory yourself rather than using a vector:

class Node {
public:
    // In the constructor, initialize your array of children to NULL
    // and the size of your children array to zero
    Node() : mChildren(NULL), mSize(0) {}

    void AddChild(Node* newChild) {
        // allocate space for your new array
        Node** newArray = new Node*[mSize + 1];

        // copy over nodes from old array to new array
        for (int i = 0; i < mSize; i++) {
            newArray[i] = mChildren[i];
        }

        // add in our new child to the end of the array
        newArray[mSize++] = newChild;

        // if there was an old array (null check) free the memory
        if (mChildren) {
            delete [] mChildren;
        }

        // set our children array equal to our new array
        mChildren = newArray;
    }

    Node* AccessChild(size_t index) {
        // make sure it's a valid index and then return
        assert(index < mSize);
        return mChildren[index];
    }

private:
    Node** mChildren;
    int mSize;
};

This will have no extra space for extra nodes, but it will require the size of an int in order to keep track of how many nodes you are storing. I don't see any way you could do it without this or having a constant number of children.

Please note, vectors double in size each time they need to reallocate because this is more efficient. While the solution above will be more efficient memory-wise, it will hurt a lot performance wise because it will require an allocation for every child addition, which is going to take O(N) allocations to add N nodes.

The performance of a vector will be O(log(N)) allocations to add N nodes, but again this solution sounds like it has the memory efficiency you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
Everything's ok, but i also need constant time to every node. I know how many nodes will be, but i dont know how to make array of every node. It should work something like: <code> array[n];<br> A_Node *array[0]= new A_Node(16);<br> A_Node *n = new A_Node(1);<br> array[0]->addChild(n);<br> array[1]=n;<br> </code> Or: <code> *(array+1)=n;</code> –  Piotr Łużecki Feb 26 '12 at 11:21
2  
Please post code in an edit in your question rather than copying comments on to each answer. It's much more readable. Also, if your question isn't answered, it will get more attention if it is not marked as answered. If you have an unrelated (to the first question) follow up question, consider asking a new question entirely. –  arasmussen Feb 26 '12 at 11:24

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