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To make multigraphs which is weighted also , i do following thing

#include <iostream>   
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

struct maps
{
    vector<char> weight(10); //to store weight of self-loops and multi-edges 
};

int main()
{ 
    maps m1[101][101], m2[101][101];

    return 0;
}

but I get following errors:

error: expected identifier before numeric constant  
error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before numeric constant

How can I fix this?

share|improve this question
1  
vector<char> weight;. Don't initiate member at struct definition. They should be initiated in constructor or after that. –  Ade YU Feb 26 '12 at 11:12
    
@AdeYU : i don't get you –  T.J. Feb 26 '12 at 11:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As Ade YU mentioned, do not define the size of your weight vector in it's declaration. Instead, do it in the initializer list in the constructor. This should do what you're looking for:

#include <iostream>   
#include <vector>   

using namespace std;

struct maps
{
    maps() : weight(10) {}
    vector<char> weight; //to store weight of self-loops and multi-edges 
};

int main()
{ 
    maps m1[101][101], m2[101][101];

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
i want a vector of weight of size 10.how to do that?? –  T.J. Feb 26 '12 at 11:28
    
In the constructor, it initializes the vector to size 10. –  arasmussen Feb 26 '12 at 11:32
    
vector of weight of size 10 helps to store various values/weight of edges that may be present in graphs. –  T.J. Feb 26 '12 at 11:36
    
why it done so? –  T.J. Feb 26 '12 at 11:39
    
The constructor of a vector takes in a size, so when I'm calling weight(10) in the initializer list of maps, I'm passing it the size of that vector to initialize it with. –  arasmussen Feb 26 '12 at 11:42

You need to initialize the vector in the constructor. Try this:

#include <iostream>   
#include <vector>   
using namespace std;
struct maps{
  maps() : weight(10) {}
  vector<char> weight;//to store weight of self-loops and multi-edges 
};

int main()
{ 
  maps m1[101][101], m2[101][101];
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
why it is done that way? –  T.J. Feb 26 '12 at 11:39
    
You can not call constuctor when declaring a class member. You need to call it explicitly in the class constructor. And from c++ point of view struct and class differ only by their default access(public vs. private). –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 26 '12 at 11:44

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