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I have a Client Dimension and a Fact table which tracks Sessions with Clients, these have the following columns:

Code:

[DimClient]
----------
PK_ClientKey
ClientNumber
EmailAddress
Postcode
PostcodeLongitude
PostcodeLatitude
DateOfBirth
Gender *
Sexuality *
CulturalIdentity *
LanguageSpokenAtHome *
CountryOfBirth
UsualAccommodation *
LivingWith *
OccupationStatus *
HighestLevelOfSchooling *
RegistrationDate
LastLoginDate
Status

[FactSession]
-------------
PK_SessionKey
FK_ClientKey
...

My first requirement was to start grouping the age of the Clients at a specific Session (FactSession), the best way to approach this was to create a Age Group dimension and create a foreign key (FK_AgeGroupKey) in the FactSession to the DimAgeGroup dimension.

Now I'm thinking it would be good to track all the columns with an * (above). These could (not yet proven) have a high correlation against Sessions. Reading through the DWH Toolkit it seems a Mini Dimension to accomodate all the * columns along with the Age Group would suit best, so I put together the following structure:

Code:

[DimClient]
----------
PK_ClientKey
ClientNumber
...
Status

[DimDemographic]
-----------------
PK_DemographicKey
AgeGroup
Gender
Sexuality
...
HighestLevelOfSchooling

[FactSession]
-------------
PK_SessionKey
FK_ClientKey
FK_DemographicKey

The DimDemographic table would need to utilize a SCD Type 2 to be able to track the changes over time. Would this be the best approach to my requirements?

Additionally, I have RegistrationDate and LastLoginDate columns on my Client Dimension, in the case where a Client registers but never logs in what would be the best value to put in the LastLoginDate field? Something like '1900-01-01' or NULL?

Sorry for the long post but hopefully I have given enough information Thanks in advance!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, the above solution should work fine. It supports your need to track changes over time, otherwise you can have included the DimDemographic linkage directly in DimClient. Regarding the date question, I believe you should use NULL, it means that there is no value because there was no login. Also, identifying non-logged-in would be:

select * from DimClient where LastLoginDate IS NULL 

For me this reads much better than a query that uses an artificial date.

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Thanks mr. kav. I think rolling the demographics all in the DimClient makes sense however I wonder how I should handle AgeGroup. I would like to know the AgeGroup of a Client at the time of Session. I guess I would have to introduce logic in the ETL so that it looks if a new Session has occured a year later and if so update the AgeGroup in the DimClient? –  schone Feb 27 '12 at 0:49
    
There are two approaches here, the first assumes that the ETL process only runs forward, i.e. you will not need to reconstruct the AgeGroup of a year ago. Each day the ETL runs and builds the agg data aside. In this method you can manage it within DimClient. The second approach and my preference is to use the table structure you've used, it will allow you to reconstruct the DWH at any time because data will always be cataloged correctly in the source database. Does it make sense? –  itayw Feb 27 '12 at 9:26
    
mr. kav, makes sense, I think I will move ahead with the junk/mini dimension and but not preload all data, only load unique combinations which come apparent otherwise I would be loading millions of maybe unrelated data. I do know that I shouldn't be loading data in a junk/mini dimension if the correlation is low but the idea is to see if there is any correlation. Thanks again! –  schone Feb 27 '12 at 9:43

I would add a field to your client dimensions to indicate the user has never logged in. Something like:

select * form DimClient where HasUserLoggedIn = 'NO';

Its very human readable and you won't have to teach your business users about nulls. Traditionally nulls are bad in a Data Warehouse except in the case of numeric fact values, due to the complexities of null != null.

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