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I wrote this and I want to start and end the loop with certain colors (e.g. start with rgb 150,150,200; end with rgb 190, 160, 200):

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
 <head>

 </head>
 <body>

  <canvas width="400" height="100"></canvas>

  <script>

   var context = document.getElementsByTagName('canvas')[0].getContext('2d');


   var lastX = context.canvas.width * Math.random();
   var lastY = context.canvas.height * Math.random();


   var hue = 100;

   function blank() {
    hue = hue + 5 * Math.random();

    context.fillStyle = 'hsl(' + hue + ', 60%, 80%)';

    context.fillRect(0, 0, context.canvas.width, context.canvas.height);

   }
   setInterval(blank, 50);

  </script>

 </body>
</html>


How can I change the starting color?

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2  
And the question is ?? –  Pablo Fernandez Jun 3 '09 at 15:06
    
well, it actually starts with rgb 190,160,200; how can i change the starting color? blacksheep –  blacksheep Jun 3 '09 at 15:14
    
You want a gradient? –  Lucero Jun 3 '09 at 15:26
    
I can't believe you wrote this yourself. –  Georg Schölly Jun 3 '09 at 16:13
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3 Answers

The hue variable and the percentages in the hsl style controls the color.

To start with the RGB color 150, 150, 200, set the hue to 240, the saturation (the second parameter in hsl) to 25% and the brightness (the third parameter) to 78%.

To end at the RGB color 190, 160, 200, you need to loop until the hue value reaches 285. You also need a variable for the saturation value, as that should end at 20%.

HSL colors

Alternatively, use RGB colors instead of HSL colors...

Edit:
If you want to stop the interval, you need to store it's handle in a variable:

var interval = window.setInterval(blank, 50);

Then you can use it to stop the interval:

window.clearInterval(interval);

I don't know exactly why you would want to use a random value to change the color. For simplicity I just replaced it with a fixed value in this example:

var hue = 240;
var sat = 25;

function blank() {
   context.fillStyle = 'hsl(' + hue + ', ' + sat + '%, 80%)';
   context.fillRect(0, 0, context.canvas.width, context.canvas.height);

   hue += 0.9;
   sat -= 0.1;

   if (hue > 285) window.clearInterval(interval);
}

var interval = window.setInterval(blank, 50);

Edit:
If you want to repeatedly fade in and out instead of ending at a specific color, create a variable for the direction, and change it when you reach each ending color:

var hue = 240;
var sat = 25;
var dir = 1;

function blank() {
   context.fillStyle = 'hsl(' + hue + ', ' + sat + '%, 80%)';
   context.fillRect(0, 0, context.canvas.width, context.canvas.height);

   hue += 0.9 * dir;
   sat -= 0.1 * dir;

   if (hue <= 240 || hue >= 285) dir = -dir;
}

window.setInterval(blank, 50);
share|improve this answer
    
thanx, the start-color works of course now, but whats the code for the loop? –  blacksheep Jun 3 '09 at 16:03
    
I added an example on how to loop to the specific values, and how to end the interval. –  Guffa Jun 3 '09 at 16:44
    
sorry, but my english isn't good enough to explain what i want to build. check this .gif to see: blacksheep.sil.at/li_o.gif –  blacksheep Jun 4 '09 at 9:52
    
I added another example. –  Guffa Jun 4 '09 at 11:11
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Here is one way to do it. Tweak step as per your preference. Room for improvement by somebody who knows js better than me...

 var r1 = 150; var g1 = 150; var b1 = 200;
 var r2 = 190; var g2 = 160; var b2 = 200;
 var step = 0.02;
 var curr = 0;
 var blankIvID;

 function blank() 
 {
  var r = r1 + ((r2 - r1) * curr);
  var g = g1 + ((g2 - g1) * curr);
  var b = b1 + ((b2 - b1) * curr);
  curr = curr + step;
  context.fillStyle = 'rgb(' + r + ', ' + g + ', ' + b + ')';

  context.fillRect(0, 0, context.canvas.width, context.canvas.height);
  if (curr >= 1.0)
  {
    clearInterval(blankIvID);
  }
 }
 blankIvID = setInterval(blank, 50);
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You should check the hsl() function somehwere?

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1  
I would rather think that they are the coordinates for the top left corner of the rectangle... –  Guffa Jun 3 '09 at 15:36
    
You're right, took it out... –  Ropstah Jun 3 '09 at 15:48
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