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I have been reading about an objective-c singleton example from http://getsetgames.com/2009/08/30/the-objective-c-singleton/. The .m code looks like

+(MySingleton*)sharedMySingleton{
@synchronized([MySingleton class])
{if (!_sharedMySingleton)
    if(!_sharedMySingleton)
    return _shareMySingleton;
}

....
-(id)init{
    self = [super init];
    if(self != nil){}
    return self;
}
....

Thanks for your example, but I have a confused place, in your code, I am wondering in which place the static MySingleton* _sharedMySingleton is initialized. for example if we would have to have some implementation like

-(id)init{
    self = [super init];
    if(self != nil){
        _sharedMySingleton = self
    }
    return self;
}
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2 Answers 2

you can use macro from http://code.google.com/p/google-toolbox-for-mac/source/browse/trunk/Foundation/GTMObjectSingleton.h it is vvveeerryyy easy to use

in implementation file (m)

GTMOBJECT_SINGLETON_BOILERPLATE(ClassName, sharedInstance)

and header file

+ (ClassName *) sharedInstance;
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You miscopied a part of the code from the link you posted by mistake.

@implementation MySingleton
static MySingleton* _sharedMySingleton = nil;

+(MySingleton*)sharedMySingleton
{
    @synchronized([MySingleton class])
    {
        if (!_sharedMySingleton)
            [[self alloc] init];

        return _sharedMySingleton;
    }

    return nil;
}

+(id)alloc
{
    @synchronized([MySingleton class])
    {
        NSAssert(_sharedMySingleton == nil, @"Attempted to allocate a second instance of a singleton.");
        _sharedMySingleton = [super alloc];
        return _sharedMySingleton;
    }

    return nil;
}

-(id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self != nil) {
        // initialize stuff here
    }

    return self;
}

-(void)sayHello {
    NSLog(@"Hello World!");
}
@end

looking at the code from the post you are asking about it actually makes sense. What he is doing in the static method +(MySingleton*)sharedMySingleton is that he is checking if the _sharedMySingletonobject has a value he is returning it, if not it gets initialized. The alloc method is the one setting the singleton object, its not being set in the initializer. technically its the same, since its going to be point on the same object that will be initialized a moment after. I hope that clarifies your confusion.

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