Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to insert a value at the end of a doubly linked list , I get successful in inserting the value at head or first node but the second value is not getting inserted

The issue here is while entering the second value

class d_list
{
private:

    struct node
    {
        double data;
        node *next;
        node *previous;
    };

    node *first;
    node *last ;
public:
    d_list(void)
    {
        first = nullptr;
        last = nullptr;
    };
    void append(double);

};

void d_list::append(double num)
{
    node *ptr;
    node *toinsert;
    if(!first)
    {
        first = new node;
        first->previous= nullptr;
        first->data = num;
        last= new node;
        first->next= last->previous;
        last->previous = first->next;
        last->next= nullptr;

    }
    else
    {
        if(last->next == nullptr)
        {
            ptr = new node;
            ptr->next =last->previous;
            ptr->data=num;
            last->previous = ptr->next  ;
        }


        last->next= nullptr;
    }

}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    d_list aa;
    cout<<"going to append first"<<endl;
    aa.append(44);
    cout<<"going to append second"<<endl;
    aa.append(50.5);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is the symptom? What did you learn when your ran your program in the debugger? –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 26 '12 at 14:22
1  
Please stop writing ",C++" at the end of all your titles. We know it's C++, because it has the c++ tag. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 26 '12 at 14:24
    
a few time when I did changings it showed the access violation error , if made a tweet and it got eradicated then I see no vlaue in the next node data of head , also no value at the previous of last node –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 14:24
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I write it for search engine, I feel this title of my question is also been searched at Google , so that next time anyone Google it get answer without using space of SO –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 14:25
    
@sparkling_spark: Stack Overflow already puts the first tag in the title, and presents metadata properly. I wouldn't worry about search engines; SO is very good at being indexed, as I'm sure you've noticed. Writing tags in titles in some personal, unconventional, unindexed, inconsistent style just confuses that system and makes searching worse. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 26 '12 at 14:26
show 3 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a number of problems in your code:

  • Your node next and previous members are never initialized anywhere and as a result are undefined when used. Either add a constructor to node or ensure they are initialized after allocation.
  • The addition of a node to an empty list is not correct. first->next is left undefined and why are you creating two nodes, both first and last? In a list with one element then first == last. The setting of next/previous in first/last doesn't make any sense either.
  • In a well formed double-linked list then last->next should always be null, as should first->previous.
  • The addition of a node into a non-empty list is also incorrect.
  • While you don't show it in the example, you'll eventually need a destructor as well as a copy operator and copy constructor (the rule of three). At the moment you are leaking memory and if you try to delete nodes you'll likely result in a double-free and crash.

I would suggest taking a step back from the code for a bit to ensure you properly understand the concepts behind a doubly-linked list. Draw out a list on paper with next/prev arrows and see how they need to be changed when adding nodes to an empty/non-empty list as well as how to delete and move nodes around. Once you figure out how next/prev should be set then translating that into code should be relatively straight forward.

Edit to answer comment: To add a new node you can technically add it anywhere but it is usually added at the end (at least from what I've seen). See the other answers for a complete and correct code for adding new nodes in an empty and non-empty list.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks , thats a v nice lesson –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 15:25
    
i highly appreciate the experts which talk about the core concepts and stimulate thinking –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 15:32
    
I figured out this , that when ever I create first node (by new ) I point out its previous to null , and point its next to last , now here is a thing , should I assign last to create a new node? I am not understanding the entry of 2nd item to the list . –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 16:12
add comment
...
if(last->next == nullptr)
{
  ptr = new node;
  ptr->next =last->previous; // <- is not correct
  ptr->data=num;
  last->previous = ptr->next  ; // <- does not do anything useful
  ...

You don't append your new node to the list.

...
if(!last->next)
{
  ptr = new node;
  ptr->previous=last->previous;
  ptr->next =last;
  ptr->data=num;
  last->previous = ptr  ;
  ...

should be better. By the way: delete the allocated memory in a destructor!

share|improve this answer
    
why this please ? if(!last->next) –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 14:56
    
and there is one more thing please , it do append data at the end but in debugger it does not show data in the next of first –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 15:07
1  
Yes, you made the same mistake there. first->next should be last and last->previous should be first for the first element insertion. !last->next is the same as last->next == 0. Note that you should initialize first.next/previous with 0. Create a constructor for that. –  alfa Feb 26 '12 at 15:27
    
didnt I had it ? d_list(void) { first = nullptr; last = nullptr; }; –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 16:15
1  
You implemented a constructor for list. You did non implement a constructor for node. –  alfa Feb 26 '12 at 18:39
add comment

I would write your double linked list in following code:

    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;
    class d_list
    {
    private:

        struct node
        {
            double data;
            node *next;
            node *previous;
        };

        node *first;
        // node *last ; no need for bidirectional list
    public:
        d_list(void)
        {
            first = nullptr;
            //last = nullptr;
        };
        void append(double);

    };

    void d_list::append(double num)
    {
        node *ptr = new node;
        ptr->data = num;
        node *toinsert;
        if(!first)
        {
            first = ptr;
            first->previous=first->next=first;
        }
        else
        {
            if(first->next == first)
            {
                ptr->next = ptr->previous = first;
                first->next = first->previous = ptr;
            }
            else{
                node *last = first->previous;
                ptr->next = first;
                ptr->previous = last;
                last->next = ptr;
                first->previous = ptr;
            }
        }
    }


    int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
    {
        d_list aa;
        cout<<"going to append first"<<endl;
        aa.append(44);
        cout<<"going to append second"<<endl;
        aa.append(50.5);

        return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I need bi directional link list , isn't bi directional is a doubly liked list ? –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 14:47
    
i think this will need iterations if you want to insert at the last , cant we avoid it by having birectional list ? –  sparkling_spark Feb 26 '12 at 14:49
    
I treat double linked list same as bi directional link list. there is no need to iterate to insert at the last, just use last=first->previous. –  Brent Jiang Feb 27 '12 at 11:12
add comment

Why have you inserted the declarations node *ptr; and node *toinsert; if you don't use them? Also it should be obvious that if you insert a single node at the end, then only one new element should be created(and you call new twice if first is null).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this code...

class d_list 
{


private:
      struct node
      {
         double data;
         node *next;
         node *previous;
     };
      node *first;
     node *last ;

 public:
     d_list(void)
     {
         first = nullptr;
         last = nullptr;
     };

     void append(double);
  }; 

 void d_list::append(double num)
 {
     node *ptr;
     node *toinsert;
     if(!first)
     {
         first = last = new node;
         first->previous= nullptr;
         first->next = nullptr;
         first->data = num;
     }
     else
     {
             ptr = new node;
             ptr->next =last->previous;
             ptr->data=num;
             last->previous = ptr->next  ;
     }
  }


 int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
 {
     d_list aa;
     cout<<"going to append first"<<endl;
     aa.append(44);
     cout<<"going to append second"<<endl;
     aa.append(50.5);
      return 0;
 } 
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.