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I ran several times an application with different input parameters in order to collect execution times.

The input parameters are 6: v, n, m, b, p and c.

Conceptually I can think of my results as a multidimensional array, where any dimension is a different parameter: times[A][B][C][D][E][F] would contain the execution time of the simulation using parameters v=A, n=B, m=C, b=D, p=E and c=F.

I'd like to be able to fix some of these parameters and iterate over the others:

for A:
  for C:
    for F:
      times[A][0][C][0][0][F]

The input parameters values are sparse, so I should use dictionaries instead of lists.

I was thinking about using a dict of dict of dict of dict of dict of dict to do the whole thing, each execution time would be represented like this:

times = { A:{ B:{ C:{ D:{ E:{ F:{time} } } } } } }

but this solution doesn't look elegant at all: building the whole structure and iterating over it is a pain.

Is there any better way to work with my data?

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Can you store it by a tuple of the parameters, so you do times[A,B,C,D,E,F] –  Thomas K Feb 26 '12 at 15:14
    
@Thomas: With a dictionary of tuples I wouldn't be able to fix some variables and iterate over the others: for n in times[v]: print( times[v][n][m][b][p][c] ) –  peoro Feb 26 '12 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First, if you have to use a dictionary, why not just create a single dictionary, using tuples to index it? Second, use itertools.product to avoid troublesome nested loops:

>>> import itertools
>>> d = {}
>>> for tup in itertools.product(range(5), repeat=2):
...     d[tup] = tup
... 
>>> d
{(1, 3): (1, 3), (3, 0): (3, 0), (2, 1): (2, 1), (0, 3): (0, 3), (4, 0): (4, 0), 
 (1, 2): (1, 2), (3, 3): (3, 3), (4, 4): (4, 4), (2, 2): (2, 2), (4, 1): (4, 1), 
 (1, 1): (1, 1), (3, 2): (3, 2), (0, 0): (0, 0), (0, 4): (0, 4), (1, 4): (1, 4), 
 (2, 3): (2, 3), (4, 2): (4, 2), (1, 0): (1, 0), (0, 1): (0, 1), (3, 1): (3, 1), 
 (2, 4): (2, 4), (2, 0): (2, 0), (4, 3): (4, 3), (3, 4): (3, 4), (0, 2): (0, 2)}

However, there might be better ways to create a sparse array. scipy provides sparse matrices, but they are 2-d only, I believe.

Here are some other usage patterns you might find useful:

>>> for tup in itertools.product(range(5), repeat=2):
...     if tup[0] == tup[1]:
...         d[tup] = tup
... 
>>> d
{(3, 3): (3, 3), (0, 0): (0, 0), (1, 1): (1, 1), (4, 4): (4, 4), (2, 2): (2, 2)}

>>> for tup in itertools.product(range(5), range(2)):
...     print d.get(tup)
... 
(0, 0)
None
None
(1, 1)
None
None
None
None
None
None

To be less oblique, here's how you would hold one variable constant: just pass a one-item sequence to itertools.product:

>>> for tup in itertools.product(range(3), [2], range(3)):
...     print tup
... 
(0, 2, 0)
(0, 2, 1)
(0, 2, 2)
(1, 2, 0)
(1, 2, 1)
(1, 2, 2)
(2, 2, 0)
(2, 2, 1)
(2, 2, 2)
share|improve this answer
    
yes, I didn't get it at the beginning, thanks for the clarifications! The only problem I still have is that I can't use range() to generate the values for an input parameter, since they are sparse and I don't know statically what values are in. Is there any way to generate all and only the values present in the i-th element of my tuples? (ie: itertools.product([0], [2], elements_present_in_3rd_field_of_my_dict_keys) ) –  peoro Feb 26 '12 at 15:26
    
@peoro, well, I think I'd need to know more about what you're doing to answer that question. A list of all the existing keys is easy to get: just iterate over the dict, sorting if you want the keys in order. And the problem you state doesn't apply to inserting values into the dict. In what use-case will you need to iterate only over those values in the dict, and sorted(d) won't give you what you want? In any case, you don't have to use range; you could always just use a sequence like (1, 5, 6, 8). –  senderle Feb 26 '12 at 15:31
    
@peoro, thinking about it a bit more, it sounds like you want to iterate over only items such that k[2] == 5. It's true that querying "rows" this way may be less efficient in the single-dict case. Maybe your nested dict solution is the right one for your use case if so; it depends on how dynamic the data is. In effect, the above makes creation and insertion very easy and fast, but makes certain kinds of queries harder and potentially slower. Still, you could always iterate over the keys and filter them. Whether this slows you down more than the nested approach depends a lot on your data. –  senderle Feb 26 '12 at 15:45

You could create a one-dimensional dictionary using a combination of parameters inside a tuple as a key, that'd be much simpler:

times[('v', 'n', 'm', 'b', 'p', 'c')] = value
share|improve this answer
    
This would be a lot simpler indeed, but I wouldn't be able to fix some values and iterate over the others -- unless using something like itertools.product as suggested by senderle. –  peoro Feb 26 '12 at 15:27

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