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This is my class

public class csWordSimilarity
{
    public int irColumn1 = 0;
    public int irColumn2 = 0;
    public int irColumn3 = 0;
    public int irColumn4 = 0;
    public int irColumn5 = 0;
}

I want to make that class iterable to be used like the way below

 foreach (int irVal in myVarWordSimilarity)
 {

 } 

myVarWordSimilarity is csWordSimilarity type. So i want to iterate all public int variables. How do i need to modify csWordSimilarity class for making it iterable like the way above.

C# 4.0

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1  
Is there a reason why you would not use List<int>? If yes, then look at implementing IEnumerable. –  Davin Tryon Feb 26 '12 at 16:58
    
Reference : How to use foreach loop with custom objects. Go through this and it will also help you understand the usage whenever you want. –  Ebad Masood Feb 26 '12 at 17:03
    
Please don't add " c#" and such to your titles. That's what the tags are for. –  John Saunders Feb 26 '12 at 17:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can implement IEnumerable and have the GetEnumerator override return an "iterator" over the variables using the yield statement

class csWordSimilarity : IEnumerable<int>
{
    private int _var1 = 1;
    private int _var2 = 1;
    private int _var3 = 1;
    private int _var4 = 1;

    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
    {
        yield return _var1;
        yield return _var2;
        yield return _var3;
        yield return _var4;
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }
}
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thanks a lot for answer though your solution giving error "Using the generic type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<T>' requires 1 type arguments" –  MonsterMMORPG Feb 26 '12 at 17:21
    
Which version of .NET are you using? I can't think of a way to replicate that error since .NET 4 allows you to omit the template type definition so it will become an IEnumerable<object> –  edvaldig Feb 26 '12 at 20:17

Implement IEnumerable. See Using Iterators (C# Programming Guide)

In your case you could just use the built-in iterator of a List like so:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class csWordSimilarity : IEnumerable<int> {
    public int irColumn1 = 0;
    public int irColumn2 = 0;
    public int irColumn3 = 0;
    public int irColumn4 = 0;
    public int irColumn5 = 0;

    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator() {
        return (new List<int>() { 
            irColumn1, irColumn2, irColumn3, irColumn4, irColumn5 
        }).GetEnumerator();
    }
    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }
}
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There is a considerable overhead in instantiating a new List instance for the sole purpose of returning an enumerator of it, the yield statement simplifies this and is more optimal. –  edvaldig Feb 26 '12 at 17:06
    
@edvaldig I think it's a matter of preference. If you're going to call this millions of times, then yes use the direct yield. Otherwise I prefer using BCL classes and especially List where convenient. –  Joshua Honig Feb 26 '12 at 17:09
    
yes i am going to use it millions of times :) Thanks for heads up edvaldig –  MonsterMMORPG Feb 26 '12 at 17:16
    
@jmh_gr fair enough :) –  edvaldig Feb 26 '12 at 17:16

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