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I'm trying to implement a traffic fine control system. When a radar observation is introduced in the table OBSERVACION the trigger should check if there is a row with an observation over the same car, and then calculate the fine cost.

I want a trigger to check a condition statement in every row of the table. I mean, I want the trigger condtion to check all the values in the table and find if one of them is equal to the NEW value introduced. Something like this:

WHEN(NEW.fecha_foto = fecha_foto)AND...

Where fecha_foto is any value in the table.

Is it possible?

Thanks.

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1  
It's not possible, and it isn't really desirable. Why do you want to do this? –  APC Feb 26 '12 at 18:11
    
I have a table with traffic fines rows and i want to check the time between the new row and a previous existing one. –  Nausikaa Feb 26 '12 at 18:15
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what business logic are you trying to implement? –  APC Feb 26 '12 at 18:23
    
I'm trying to implement a traffic fine control system. When a radar observation is introduced in the table OBSERVACION the trigger should check if there is a row with an observation over the same car, and then calculate the fine cost. –  Nausikaa Feb 26 '12 at 18:28
1  
I posted a solution, but as someone else pointed out, it leads to Oracle's "mutating trigger" problem. Which is why I really don't like using triggers in Oracle for anything but audit tables. You're better off using a stored procedure or external client program to calculate this before attempting to insert the record in the database. –  Dan A. Feb 26 '12 at 19:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A trigger which issues DML (including SELECT) against the same table which owns the trigger raises the spectre of ORA-4091, the mutating table exception. Oracle hurls this error because it expects the outcome of a transaction to be deterministic, and a trigger which issue DML on its own table introduces uncertainty into proceedings.

Mutating table is a reliable indicator of bad design, specifically a bad data model and that seems to be the case here.

If the value of a fine is dependent on the outcome of a single observation then it is okay for FINE to be a column on the OBSERVACION table. However your business rules indicate that the value may depend on several observations, if they fall within a certain period. In this scenario the fine should be in a table of its own. You would need a foreign key between OBSERVACION and MULTA to indicate which observations are covered by a particular fine.

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I finally solved it introducing the data y want to compare in a temporary table. –  Nausikaa Feb 29 '12 at 0:54
    
To be frank that sounds like more of a kludge than a proper solution. –  APC Feb 29 '12 at 11:14

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