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I have a table with more than 300 000 rows and I need to select the highest value for the column 'id'. Usually, I will do like this:

SELECT id FROM my_table ORDER BY id DESC

... but this will cause slow queries and I don't want to use it. Is there a different way to solve this situation? id is auto increment and primary key. Thanks in advanced!

Later Edit: It seems my full code is quite bad written, as I deduct from your comments. Below I posted a sample of the code I'm working and the tables. Can you suggest a proper way to insert the last ID+1 of table_x in two tables (including table_x itself). I have to mention that the script will be running more than once.

TABLE_X          TABLE_Y
------------     ----------
id_x | value     id_y | id_x
------------     ----------
   1 | A            1 | 3
   2 | B            
   3 | C

<?php
for($i=0; $i<10; $i++){
    $result_x = mysql_query('SELECT id_x FROM table_x ORDER BY id_x DESC');
    $row_x = mysql_fetch_array($result_x);

    $next = $row_x['id_x'] + 1;
    mysql_query('INSERT INTO table_x(id_x) VALUES("'.$next.'")');
    mysql_query('INSERT INTO table_y(id_x) VALUES("'.$next.'")');
}
?>
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1  
SELECT MAX(id) –  knittl Feb 26 '12 at 19:20
1  
Um, SELECT MAX(id) as id FROM my_table. id is an auto_increment PK, and therefore indexed so this should be very fast. –  Michael Berkowski Feb 26 '12 at 19:20
1  
why do you need max id? –  Your Common Sense Feb 26 '12 at 19:21
    
I need to know what is the biggest ID in order to insert the next row with the value ID+1 –  Cosmi Feb 26 '12 at 19:28
1  
@Michael, I need to insert the ID in two tables. I revised my post, please take a look at it. –  Cosmi Feb 26 '12 at 20:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is the right code you have to use.

mysql_query('INSERT INTO table_x(id_x) VALUES(NULL)');
$id = mysql_insert_id();
mysql_query("INSERT INTO table_y(id_x) VALUES($id)");
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Oh, that's so easy. Yep, I have to use mysql_insert_id(). Thank you! –  Cosmi Feb 26 '12 at 20:19
    
auto increment feature intended to be used automatically, not manually. Otherwise you will break your database consistency. Always let database assign the id –  Your Common Sense Feb 26 '12 at 20:22

Slightly better:

SELECT id FROM my_table ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1

Significantly better:

SELECT MAX(id) FROM my_table
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Thank you. MAX() is the solution! –  Cosmi Feb 26 '12 at 19:23

Depending on the context either

SELECT id FROM my_table ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1

or mysql_insert_id() in PHP or (SELECT LAST_INSERT_ID()) in MySQL

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LAST_INSERT_ID() is connection specific and thus only in very special situations useful. –  SteAp Feb 26 '12 at 19:30
    
@SteAp Of course. Though it has to be considerably faster then searching for the max(). No need to downvote here folks. –  Mikulas Dite Feb 26 '12 at 19:35
    
Ah, OK, I now understand your comment. Grated! Please place a note in your answer - and I'm going to upvote again. If only to unlock voting for me for this answer. –  SteAp Feb 26 '12 at 19:42
    
@SteAp Again, it is context dependent, you cannot use it everywhere. The OP did not mention what he needs to do with the id and when, so this was as good suggestion as any. Obviously it cannot be used with another resource. –  Mikulas Dite Feb 26 '12 at 19:48
    
I propose to enhance the word 'context' with a bit more detail. Anyway, I can't upvote unless you edit your answer - somehow ;-) It is locked for me - due to my downvote. –  SteAp Feb 26 '12 at 19:51

As other said, you should use the MAX operator:

SELECT MAX( id ) FROM my_table ORDER BY id DESC

As a general rule of thumb, always reduce the amount of records returned from the database. The database always is faster than your application program when operating on result sets.

In case of slow queries, please give EXPLAIN a try:

EXPLAIN  SELECT id FROM my_table ORDER BY id DESC

vs.

EXPLAIN  SELECT MAX( id ) FROM my_table ORDER BY id DESC

EXPLAIN ask MySQL's query optimizer how it sees the query. Look in the documentation, to learn how to read its output.

PS: I really wonder, why you need MAX(id). Even if your application gets the value back from the database, it is useless: Another process might just during the next CPU cycle have inserted a new record - and MAX(id) isn't valid any more.

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I need to insert the ID in two tables and I can't find a proper solution. I revised my post, can you take a look please? Thanks! –  Cosmi Feb 26 '12 at 20:15
    
First, insert the main records and save the result of mysql_insert_id() in a variable. Then use this permanently valid insert-ID in the next two inset statement. All in one single script. –  SteAp Feb 26 '12 at 20:19

I guess it is slow because you retrieve all 300 000 rows. Add LIMIT 1 to the query.

SELECT id FROM my_table ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1

Or use the MAX() operator.

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