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I have a global style that sets all my TextBox styles, but in some cases I want to revert just the Foreground color to the original non-custom-style color. I tried using {TemplateBinding Foreground} inside the specific TextBoxes that I wanted to revert. It didn't end up being valid XAML and I'm not sure that's the right way anyhow.

Any ideas? Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There's a few ways this could be done. If you look at the Precedence List on the MSDN then you can see that the Forground set in ways 1-8 will override the Foreground from a default style. The easiest way being just to set the local value in the TextBox.

<TextBox Foreground="Red" />

Another thing that you can do is use the 'BasedOn' property of styles to override the other versions. This does require giving a key value to your default style, but that can then be used to also apply the default like in this example:

    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}"
		   x:Key="myTextBoxStyle">
		<Setter Property="Foreground"
				Value="Red" />
		<Setter Property="FontWeight"
				Value="Bold" />
	</Style>
	<!-- Style applies to all TextBoxes -->
	<Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}"
		   BasedOn="{StaticResource myTextBoxStyle}" />


<TextBox Text="Hello">
	<TextBox.Style>
		<Style BasedOn="{StaticResource myTextBoxStyle}" TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
			<Setter Property="Foreground"
					Value="Blue" />
		</Style>
	</TextBox.Style>
</TextBox>


Edit:
In the case that the default style is applying a value and you want to revert it to the base value there are a few ways I can think of, off hand, to get this behavior. You can't, that I know of, bind back to the default theme value in a generic manner.

We can however do some other things. If we need the style to not apply some properties, we can set the style to {x:Null}, thus stopping the default style from applying. Or we can give the element it's own style that does not inherit from the base style and then re-apply only the setters that we need:

        <TextBox Text="Hello" Style="{x:Null}" />
		<TextBox Text="Hello">
			<TextBox.Style>
				<Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
					<Setter Property="FontWeight"
							Value="Bold" />
				</Style>
			</TextBox.Style>
		</TextBox>

We could modify the default style so that the Foreground will only be set on certain conditions, such as the Tag being a certain value.

    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}"
		   x:Key="myTextBoxStyle">
		<Setter Property="FontWeight"
				Value="Bold" />
		<Style.Triggers>
			<Trigger Property="Tag"
					 Value="ApplyForeground">
				<Setter Property="Foreground"
						Value="Red" />
			</Trigger>
		</Style.Triggers>
	</Style>

   <TextBox Text="Hello" />
    <TextBox Text="Hello" Tag="ApplyForeground" />
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1  
In your example, I don't want to have to specify "Blue". I want to do something like <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="{TemplateBinding Foreground}" />. I want its default w/o explicitly saying Value="Black". –  xanadont Jun 3 '09 at 16:42
    
Ah, that's a little different indeed. I'll edit my answer to handle that case. –  rmoore Jun 3 '09 at 16:50
    
Turns out my issue was a little different from what I described. It was really a matter of styling being applied to TextBoxes in a ListView. But I'll accept this answer to give you some SO juice since you did such a great job explaining. Thanks! –  xanadont Jun 4 '09 at 18:14
    
Thanks, glad it's solved. Also, I found a better way to assign the BasedOn property of a style. If you use BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type TextBox}}" then the style will automatically be based on whatever the default applied style for that type is. I think that's a lot better then having to create two styles like in my first code example. –  rmoore Jun 5 '09 at 3:23
    
Thanks very much for adding the comment about BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type TextBox}}". I was trying to find an alternative to the two-style approach (which your actual answer shows), and stumbled across the Q&A here. Your comment above provided exactly the tip I needed! IMHO, you should add that detail to the answer itself (maybe leaving the two-style approach in also as an example, which might help others find this answer more easily). –  Peter Duniho Feb 5 at 0:59

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