Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Existing table structure

CREATE TABLE [MYTABLE](
    [ROW1] [numeric](18, 0) NOT NULL,
    [ROW2] [numeric](18, 0) NOT NULL,
    [ROW3] [numeric](18, 0) NOT NULL,
    [ROW4] [numeric](18, 0) NULL,
    CONSTRAINT [MYTABLE_PK] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([ROW1] ASC, [ROW2] ASC, [ROW3] ASC)
)

This table has 2 non-clustered indexes, and the following stats:

RowCount:    5260744
Data Space:  229.609 MB
Index Space: 432.125 MB

I wanted to reduce the size of the indexes, and use a surrogate primary key as the clustered index, instead of the natural composite key.

New table structure

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[TEST_RUN_INFO](
    [ROW1] [numeric](18, 0) NOT NULL,
    [ROW2] [numeric](18, 0) NOT NULL,
    [ROW3] [numeric](18, 0) NOT NULL,
    [ROW4] [numeric](18, 0) NULL,
    [ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT [MYTABLE_PK] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([ID] ASC)
)

Still with only 2 non-clustered indexes, here's the new stats:

RowCount:    5260744
Data Space:  249.117 MB
Index Space: 470.867 MB

Question

Can someone account for how a clustered index using 3 NUMERIC(18,0) columns is smaller than a clustered index using a single INT column?

I rebuilt the indexes before and after the changes, and the fill factor is set to 0 for both structures.

The two non-clustered indexes are the same, and were not changed to include the new ID column.

sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats

Stats taken with the ID column

Composite clustered index

INDEX   TYPE            DEPTH   LEVEL   PAGECOUNT   RECORDCOUNT RECORDSIZE  
1       CLUSTERED       3       0       31884       5260744     47
1       CLUSTERED       3       1       143         31884       34
1       CLUSTERED       3       2       1           143         34
5       NONCLUSTERED    3       0       27404       5260744     40
5       NONCLUSTERED    3       1       167         27404       46
5       NONCLUSTERED    3       2       1           167         46
6       NONCLUSTERED    3       0       27400       5260744     40
6       NONCLUSTERED    3       1       164         27400       46
6       NONCLUSTERED    3       2       1           164         46

INT clustered index

INDEX   TYPE            DEPTH   LEVEL   PAGECOUNT   RECORDCOUNT RECORDSIZE  
1       CLUSTERED       3       0       31887       5260744     47
1       CLUSTERED       3       1       54          31887       11
1       CLUSTERED       3       2       1           54          11
5       NONCLUSTERED    4       0       29893       5260744     44
5       NONCLUSTERED    4       1       198         29893       50
5       NONCLUSTERED    4       2       3           198         50
5       NONCLUSTERED    4       3       1           3           50
6       NONCLUSTERED    4       0       29891       5260744     44
6       NONCLUSTERED    4       1       193         29891       50
6       NONCLUSTERED    4       2       2           193         50
6       NONCLUSTERED    4       3       1           2           50
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The clustered index leaf pages include all the columns of the table (not just the key columns). By adding a surrogate primary key you have just increased the length of all rows in the leaf pages by 4 bytes. Multiply that out by 5,260,744 rows and that equals an additional 20 MB to store the ID column.

The key is narrower however so you may well have fewer non leaf level pages (use sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats to see this) and as the clustered index key is used as the row locator in the non clustered indexes this can make those smaller (but less covering) too.

share|improve this answer
    
If I keep the new ID identity column, but revert back to the composite clustered index, the clustered index size shrinks. –  jhsheets Feb 26 '12 at 21:29
    
How are you getting these sizes? What is the output of USE YOURDB; SELECT * FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),OBJECT_ID('YOURTABLE'),NULL,NULL, 'DETAILED') for both? (Make sure you adjust DB name and table name before running) –  Martin Smith Feb 26 '12 at 21:48
    
Thanks. I found a few queries on the net to display the index size, as well as right-clicking on the table and going to the storage tab. They all confirmed the index size had grown. I've printed out the relevant portions of the sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats view, and put them in my original question. I'll look it over, but any insight you have on why there's a larger depth/record count on the non-clustered indexes would be great. –  jhsheets Feb 26 '12 at 22:05
    
Seems to be the NCIs not the CI that has really grown. Are the NCIs with indexid 5 and 6 just ROW1,ROW2,ROW3 again in different orders? Looks like the key for both of those has increased by 4 bytes too. For Non Unique Non clustered indexes the CI key is added to the NCI key. –  Martin Smith Feb 26 '12 at 22:07
    
Yep, saw that the CI did shrink, which makes sense. The NCI's use ROW1, ROW2, ROW3 and ROW4 in different orders. –  jhsheets Feb 26 '12 at 22:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.