Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is probably something very basic, but I couldn't find an answer to this elsewhere:

it seems in an interation over an array I can add to a default variable to target other items in the array but I cannot substract from it, like so:

foreach (0..$#array) {
    if ( $array[$_] =~ m/PATTERN/ ) {
        $array[$_] = $TRING1;
        $array[$_+1] = $TRING2;
        $array[$_-1] = $TRING3;
    };
};

It just doesn't assign anything to the previous item but leaves it as it was (I never get <0).

I'm probably missing something trivial here?

share|improve this question
1  
Can't reproduce your problem. Could you post a small script that is runnable and reproduces your issue? –  Mat Feb 26 '12 at 21:30
    
STRING1, STRING2, and STRING3 are barewords. Make sure to always use strict; and use warnings;. Every. Single. Time. –  Jack Maney Feb 26 '12 at 21:33
    
@JackManey I do use strict and warnings. The barewords were only here to say "some string". I'm sorry, I'll edit that. –  jcm Feb 26 '12 at 21:39
1  
@jcm - Fair enough. Thanks for the clarification. A couple of possibly unintended consequences that your code might have: 1. On the first step ($_==0), you might be changing the last element of @array. 2. A particular element of the array may end up getting changed more than once, depending on what your pattern is. –  Jack Maney Feb 26 '12 at 21:43
2  
As demonstrated above and in tanget's answer, your code is unreliable. You are probably asking The Wrong Question. You would get a better answer if you were to describe what you are trying to accomplish with this loop. –  TLP Feb 26 '12 at 22:43

1 Answer 1

You seem to be changing the elements in your array at the same time as you are iterating over them and checking for a pattern. If you put a print statement in you will see:

my @array = qw/PATTERN PATTERN PATTERN/;
my ($str1,$str2,$str3) = qw/A B C/;
foreach (0..$#array) {
    print qq|Index is $_, pattern is $array[$_]\n|;
    if ( $array[$_] =~ m/PATTERN/ ) {
        $array[$_]      = $str1;
        $array[$_+1]    = $str2;
        $array[$_-1]    = $str3;
    };
};

Prints:
Index is 0, pattern is PATTERN
Index is 1, pattern is B
Index is 2, pattern is C

Creating a new array will help but it's still an unpredictable construct as far as I can see.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.