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If I have:

char *tokenPtr = "testingpointerindex"

and I want to access everything after the 4th character, how would I go about that? I tried :

char *tokenPtr = "testingpointerindex";

char *host = tokenPtr + 4;
printf("%s\n",host);

return host;

It's just an outake but I hope it gives enough info, I get a bus error. Thanks

EDIT:

The full code

char * getHost(char *buf){
char *tokenPtr;
tokenPtr = strtok(buf, "\r\n" ); 
printf("got token\n");
while ( tokenPtr != NULL ) { 
    if(strncmp(tokenPtr,"Host",4) == 0){
        break;
    }
    else{
        tokenPtr = strtok( NULL, "\r\n" );
    }
}
char *host = tokenPtr + 7;
printf("%s\n",host);
    return host;
}
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
char *msg = "GET /index.html HTTP/1.1\r\n Host: www.google.com\r\n\r\n";
getHost(msg);


}
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3  
You want to get the sub-string after the 4th character, so you did tokenPtr + 7? Where did you pull that 7 out of? –  Tim Cooper Feb 26 '12 at 21:38
    
ohh sorry, my mistake, I just want everything after an nth index, I realise my code and my example at the start don't match, I'll edit it –  drunkmonkey Feb 26 '12 at 21:40
1  
The code you posted works fine. The bus error must be somewhere else. –  prelic Feb 26 '12 at 21:42
    
@drunkmonkey: are you doing something like p = malloc(N); p += 4; free(p);? –  larsmans Feb 26 '12 at 21:50
    
I've added the complete code, it's a function taken from a larger problem so the main method was jus thrown together, no return. and the http request is a simplified made up request. –  drunkmonkey Feb 26 '12 at 21:55
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The above code works fine.

However, there's one thing to mention: string literals (e.g. "testingpointerindex") are non-modifiable in C. Therefore you should use const char *, not char *.

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1  
they are not const, they are non-modifiable, it's a big difference. –  ouah Feb 26 '12 at 21:42
    
@ouah: Could you please describe the difference? –  Cartesius00 Feb 26 '12 at 21:44
    
What's the difference between const and non-modifiable? Is it that you can cast const-ness away? –  Jason Feb 26 '12 at 21:44
    
@ouah: I wouldn't say it's a "big" difference, but you make a good point. I'll edit my answer. –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 26 '12 at 21:44
    
@Jason if a string literal was an array of const, then char *p = "hello"; would be not valid. –  ouah Feb 26 '12 at 21:45
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Change:

char *tokenPtr = "testingpointerindex";

to

static char tokenPtr[] = "testingpointerindex";

In your example, tokenPtr is a string literal and string literal are non-modifiable.

The static specifier is required in the second example if you plan to return a pointer to an element of the array as automatic variables are discarded at the end of a function.

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Note: I've updated this answer to conform to the new code posted by the OP's update

In the following code, there are a couple problems:

while ( tokenPtr != NULL ) { 
    if(strncmp(tokenPtr,"Host",4) == 0){
        break;
    }
    else{
        tokenPtr = strtok( NULL, "\r\n" );
    }
}
char *host = tokenPtr + 7;

The first problem is that there is a possibility that you could exit the while-loop because tokenPtr is NULL ... you don't guard for that possibility. Secondly, you assume that tokenPtr is pointing to a string of at least length 8 after it's been returned from strtok, but that's not necessarily true either (It should be true in your example code, but in working code it might not be true).

Finally, strtok modifies the string it processes, and you're passing it a pointer to a string-literal, which is stored in a read-only memory segment, and should not be modified. You should call strdup to create your string, knowing that you'll have to call free on the returned pointer at some point. So for instance:

int main()
{
    char *msg = strdup("GET /index.html HTTP/1.1\r\n Host: www.google.com\r\n\r\n");
    getHost(msg);

    free(msg);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Jason Feb 26 '12 at 21:42
    
Looks like we had a drive-by downvoter; all answers were affected. –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 26 '12 at 21:42
    
Yours wasn't ... I don't see what's so different from my answer and yours ... Not having vote-envy, but I'm just curious what was wrong in my answer so I can learn for next-time. –  Jason Feb 26 '12 at 21:44
    
It was, but then someone decided to remove the downvote! –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 26 '12 at 21:45
    
I hate drive-by downvoting ... thanks :-) –  Jason Feb 26 '12 at 21:48
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Fix:

char * getHost(char *buf){
char *tokenPtr;
tokenPtr = strtok(buf, "\r\n" ); 
printf("got token\n");

while ( tokenPtr != NULL ) { 

    if(strncmp(tokenPtr,"Host",4) == 0) break;

    else {tokenPtr = strtok( NULL, "\r\n"); break;}
}

char *host;
host = &tokenPtr[7];
printf("%s\n", host);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
char msg[100] = "GET /index.html HTTP/1.1\r\n Host: www.google.com\r\n\r\n";
getHost(msg);
}

Find out what was wrong ;)

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