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Given the following ActiveRecord model:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :games
  def name
    "Joe"
  end

  def city
     "Chicago"
  end
end

I'd like to retrieve a list of the methods I added directly to the User class (and not those added by extending ActiveRecord and/or adding associations). Example output:

["name","city"]

Calling User.instance_methods(false) returns method added by ActiveRecord:

["validate_associated_records_for_games", "games", "game_ids", "games=", "game_ids=", "after_create_or_update_associated_records_for_games", "before_save_associated_records_for_games"]

Along with any model attributes from database columns. I'd like to exclude those and just get the custom methods on the subclass.

My purpose is method tracing: I'd like to trace my custom methods while excluding those added by ActiveRecord.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
what version of rails are you using? –  Frederick Cheung Feb 26 '12 at 21:50
    
I'm testing w/Rails 2.2.2, but I'm open to solutions for more recent versions. –  Derek Haynes Feb 26 '12 at 22:21
    
In rails 3.2 the attribute accessors, association accessors and maybe the validations stuff are defined in methods that are included into your model for you, which makes what you're trying to do easier –  Frederick Cheung Feb 27 '12 at 7:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use a method_added hook which adds method names to a list, and monkey patch Active Record so that methods added by AR are not added to that list.

If you don't want to crack AR open and start poking around, you could also define a "class macro" which defines a method and adds it to the list. For your own custom methods, use the class macro rather than def.

If you're not familiar with what I'm referring to as a "class macro", it's simply a method like this:

class Class
  def mydef(name,&block)
    (@methods || []) << name
    define_method(name,&block)
  end
end

Using something like mydef to define methods rather than def is definitely ugly, but it would solve the problem without requiring any monkey-patching.

share|improve this answer
    
To clarify, a "class macro" is an instance method on Class which you can call from within a class block to define methods, etc. attr_accessor is another example. –  Alex D Feb 26 '12 at 21:58
    
What about arguments for methods? –  megas Feb 26 '12 at 22:03
    
If the block passed to define_method takes arguments, the generated method will also take arguments. –  Alex D Feb 26 '12 at 22:04
    
Didn't know that, thanks –  megas Feb 26 '12 at 22:11
    
Yes - this would work. Like you said, I'd need to change my method definitions across models. I like this direction though: I've overridden ActiveRecord::Base's extend method to add a method_added call to subclasses. It checks to see if the first caller's file name matches the subclass. If so, it adds the method name to an Array. This isn't perfect, but it does grab all of the methods defined in the model file. –  Derek Haynes Feb 27 '12 at 16:31
User.instance_methods - ActiveRecord::Base.instance_methods #=> [:name,:city]

UPDATE:

the order of these methods are significant

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.my_own_methods
    self.instance_methods - @@im
  end
  has_many :games
  @@im = self.instance_methods
  def name
    "Joe"
  end
  def city
    "Chicago"
  end
end

User.my_own_methods #=> [:name, :city]

This one tested and it works

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work, because the methods automatically generated by AR (such as those for DB columns) will not be in ActiveRecord::Base.instance_methods. –  Alex D Feb 26 '12 at 22:12
    
Yeah - this returns methods that ActiveRecord adds to the User class. For example, you'll see output like :games=, which I don't want, but is included because of the has many :games association. –  Derek Haynes Feb 26 '12 at 22:27
    
Updated, see the new version –  megas Feb 26 '12 at 22:36
    
Yes - this works and it's simple. Downside is that implementing it across all ActiveRecord models wouldn't be DRY and the method ordering would need to be documented. –  Derek Haynes Feb 27 '12 at 16:24

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